restaurants restaurants

Betsy's Pancake House on Canal Street in New Orleans announces its return to business after Hurricane Katrina. Ian McNulty hide caption

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Ian McNulty

Greg Gatscher, left, and his son, Evan, prepare the house for Hurricane Irma. Little did they know these metal shutters would later become a cooktop. Tara Gatscher hide caption

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Tara Gatscher

David Uzzell at work in the kitchen at Marcel's. Uzzell has a written list of daily tasks from chef and owner Robert Wiedmaier at his station, and his ever-present notepad and pencil on the shelf above serves as communication tools for more specific instructions. Kristen Hartke for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Hartke for NPR

The Market Grille in Columbia, Mo. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Grocery Stores Draw Millennials With In-Store Restaurants

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Because a high pH level makes cigars fairly alkaline, consuming tart candies like Skittles or Starbursts can help neutralize the palate. Kristen Hartke for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Hartke for NPR

Diane Gross and Khalid Pitts, owners of the Cork Wine Bar, take part in a press conference announcing their unfair competition lawsuit against the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Customers wait in line outside for a table at the Carnegie Deli. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

After 8 Decades And Countless Pastrami Sandwiches, New York's Carnegie Deli Folds

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General Manager Kristy Ramirez helps a customer at one of the El Pollo Loco franchises owned by Michaela Mendelsohn in Southern California. Mendelsohn is a transgender activist who helped launch the nation's first large-scale jobs program for transgender people. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

California Restaurants Launch Nation's First Transgender Jobs Program

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Schrafft's was a chain of restaurants, with a candy store attached, that catered to ladies who lunch. To NPR's Lynn Neary, who used to waitress there, Schrafft's "always felt like the epicenter of the comfort zone." MCNY/Gottscho-Schleisner/Getty Images hide caption

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MCNY/Gottscho-Schleisner/Getty Images

A sign at the Westside Diner in Flint, Mich., reassures customers that it serves uncontaminated water pulled from Detroit's drinking supply. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Tests Say The Water Is Safe. But Flint's Restaurants Still Struggle

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Marriage proposals are pretty routine at America's high-end restaurants. They can lift the mood in the entire dining room, boost tips and create lifelong customers. Unless the answer is "no," that is. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Chef Eric Ziebold (center left) works with his kitchen staff at CityZen in Washington, D.C., in 2012. CityZen closed in 2014 when Ziebold left to open his own restaurant. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

'Chasing An Ideal,' World-Class Chefs Find Themselves Under Extreme Pressure

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