A sign at the Westside Diner in Flint, Mich., reassures customers that it serves uncontaminated water pulled from Detroit's drinking supply. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Tests Say The Water Is Safe. But Flint's Restaurants Still Struggle

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Marriage proposals are pretty routine at America's high-end restaurants. They can lift the mood in the entire dining room, boost tips and create lifelong customers. Unless the answer is "no," that is. iStockphoto hide caption

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Chef Eric Ziebold (center left) works with his kitchen staff at CityZen in Washington, D.C., in 2012. CityZen closed in 2014 when Ziebold left to open his own restaurant. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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'Chasing An Ideal,' World-Class Chefs Find Themselves Under Extreme Pressure

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Chef Benoit Violier, whose Restaurant Hotel de Ville in Crissier, Switzerland, was named the No. 1 restaurant in the world, was found dead in what police say has the appearance of a suicide. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Meet The Most Pampered Vegetables In America

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The Big Bite Burger from Guy's American Kitchen and Bar in New York's Times Square. In 2012, New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells penned an infamous takedown of the restaurant. Krista/Flickr hide caption

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'Times' Restaurant Critic Dishes On Guy Fieri And The Art Of Reviewing

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Matthew Secich's wife, Crystal, behind the sausage counter at the deli they opened in Unity, Maine. Jennifer Mitchell/MPBN hide caption

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Chef Trades Toque For Amish Beard, Opens Off-The-Grid Deli In Maine

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A slew of Yelp reviewers said they got sick after eating at Mariscos San Juan #3 restaurant in San Jose, Calif. The county health department quickly closed the restaurant and identified an outbreak involving more than 80 cases of food poisoning. Courtesy of Giovanna Rojas hide caption

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Staff in the kitchen of The Modern, a restaurant operated by Meyer's Union Square Hospitality Group and located in the Museum of Modern Art. Ellen Silverman/Union Square Hospitality Group hide caption

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Danny Meyer To Banish Tipping And Raise Prices At His N.Y. Restaurants

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Laura Martinez may be the only blind chef in the country running her own restaurant. La Diosa opened in January. Martinez was hired directly out of culinary school by acclaimed Chicago chef Charlie Trotter and worked for him until his restaurant closed in 2012. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Chef Wants Diners To Remember Her Cooking, Not Her Blindness

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Chef Homaro Cantu holds a tomato in the kitchen of his Chicago restaurant Moto in 2007. Haute cuisine and extreme science collided in the kitchen of Chef Cantu, who took his own life Tuesday. Jeff Haynes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Late Chicago Chef Sought To Open 'A New Page In Gastronomy'

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Diners fill Riverpark, a New York City restaurant, in January. Restaurateurs fear that the tipped-wage hike being proposed in New York will force them to get rid of tipping altogether. Brad Barket/Getty Images hide caption

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Will A Tipped-Wage Hike Kill Gratuities For New York's Waiters?

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Srirupa Dasgupta opened Upohar, a restaurant and catering service, with a social mission. Her employees — primarily refugees — earn double the minimum wage. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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A Restaurant That Serves Up A Side Of Social Goals

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