The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination. iStockphoto hide caption

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A bumble bee gathers pollen in September 2007 on a sunflower at Quail Run Farm in Grants Pass, Ore., where farmer Tony Davis depends on them to pollinate crops. Bees are being wiped out by a mysterious condition known as colony collapse disorder. Jeff Barnard/AP hide caption

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Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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Beekeepers demonstrate at the EU headquarters in Brussels Monday, as lawmakers vote on whether to ban pesticides blamed for killing bees. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Wild bees, such as this Andrena bee visiting highbush blueberry flowers, play a key role in boosting crop yields. Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner hide caption

itoggle caption Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner

We knew the Honey Nut Cheerios bee liked sweet stuff. But imagine what would happen if he met green M&M? Doug Kanter/Rusty Jarrett/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Doug Kanter/Rusty Jarrett/AFP/Getty Images

Almond trees rely on bees to pollinate during their brief bloom for a few weeks in February. Winfried Rothermel/APN hide caption

itoggle caption Winfried Rothermel/APN

A report says that pollen is often filtered out of honey sold in the U.S., which could make it hard to determine if the honey came from a safe place. Ellen Webber/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ellen Webber/NPR