Jefferson's Ocean bourbon is aged on the high seas, a technique that takes advantage of basic physical chemistry. The bottles sell for $200 a piece. Courtesy of OCEARCH hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of OCEARCH

The first taste of an olive can be a bit shocking. But eventually, many of us start to enjoy bitter fruits, nuts and beverages. Screenshot from TEDxTalks/Youtube.com hide caption

itoggle caption Screenshot from TEDxTalks/Youtube.com

Take a whiff of those pears and peaches: All white wines have a citrus aroma, but some also emit tropical or more subtle fruit flavors, Richard Betts explains in his book. Text copyright 2013 by Richard Betts. Illustrations copyright (c) 2013 by Wendy MacNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. hide caption

itoggle caption Text copyright 2013 by Richard Betts. Illustrations copyright (c) 2013 by Wendy MacNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

America's Signature Whiskey: Some craft distilleries, like Catoctin Creek in Virginia, are making a whiskey that's 100 percent rye to showcase the grain's spicy, peppery flavor. Courtesy of Catoctin Creek hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Catoctin Creek

A civet cat eats red coffee cherries at a farm in Bondowoso, Indonesia. Civets are actually more closely related to meerkats and mongooses than to cats. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

The Cotton Candy grape looks and smells like a regular green grape. But the taste will evoke memories of the circus. Courtesy of Spencer Gray hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Spencer Gray

When chef Heston Blumenthal was a kid, he wondered why people loved to dunk their biscuits into tea. Courtesy of the University of Nottingham hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the University of Nottingham

Does bell pepper and black tea sound appetizing? A computer may think so. Ryan Smith/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ryan Smith/NPR

Farmers dry cacao beans in Uchiza, Peru, a file photo from 2008. Researchers are exploring the wild cacao bounty of Peru's Amazon Basin, part of an effort to jump-start the country's premium cacao industry.

Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Mejia/AP