The King Drinks, by the 17th century artist Jacob Jordaens, illustrates a feasting scene from William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. The Shakespearean larder teems with intriguing-sounding food. Culture Club/Getty Images hide caption

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Japanese food was once derided, but it's now in the canon of haute cuisine, says author Krishnendu Ray. How we value a culture's cuisine in our society, he says, often reflects the status of those who cook it. Alex Green/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Katsu curry: The British navy brought its anglicized interpretations of Indian cuisines to Imperial Japan in the 19th century. By the end of the century, the Japanese navy had adapted the British version of curry. Alpha/Flickr hide caption

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A blaa is a soft, doughy white roll – with either a soft or crusty top. It has a chewy texture that makes it a perfect vehicle for butter. Only the ones baked in Waterford, Ireland, can officially be called "blaa," but you can try out the recipe below at home. Elizabeth Rushe for NPR hide caption

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Beaver barbecue at Bootleggin' BBQ in St. Louis, Mo. Though many Catholics abstain from eating meat on Fridays during Lent, in some parts of the country, water-dwelling mammals have long been considered fair game. Alan Greenblatt for NPR hide caption

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The Indecisive Chicken combines the recipes and life stories of eight women from communities across India who now live in Dharavi, a teeming Mumbai slum. Sarita Rai, from a village in the North Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, contributed a recipe for pharas, "semi-circular pockets of rice dough" filled with chickpea flour, served steamed or deep-fried. Neville Sukhia/Courtesy of The Indecisive Chicken: Stories and recipes from eight Dharavi cooks hide caption

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A tea lady brings round refreshments for British office workers in the 1970s. All over the U.K., the arrival of the tea ladies with trolleys loaded with a steaming tea urn and a tray of cakes or buns was the high point of the workday. M. Fresco/Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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During World War II, Potato Pete, a dapper cartoon spud with a jaunty cap and spats, instructed U.K. consumers on the humble tuber's many uses – not just in standards like scalloped potatoes and savory pies but also in more surprising options, like potato scones and waffles. Imperial War Museums (Art.IWM PST 6080) hide caption

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Polish nuns do most of the cooking at the Vatican. Here, they prepare sweets for the Feast of St. Nicholas. Katarzyna Artymiak/Courtesy of Sophia Institute Press hide caption

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Hongeo, a dish of skate left to ferment in its own urine, is a beloved delicacy in parts of South Korea — despite its overpowering ammonia smell. A sashimi platter of hongeo for three to four people usually costs anywhere from 60,000 ₩ (U.S. $49.78) to 150,000 ₩ (U.S. $124.46). Marius Stankiewicz hide caption

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In 1747, members of the notorious Hawkhurst Gang carried out a brazen midnight raid on the King's Custom House in Poole, England: They broke in and stole back their impounded tea. What followed over the next weeks would shock even hardened criminals. E. Keble Chatterton - King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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The words "sherbet" and "sorbet" derive from the Persian sharbat; biryani comes from biryān; and julep started as the Persian gul-āb (rose water), then entered Arabic as julāb, and from there entered a number of European languages, with the "b" softened into a "p." my_amii/Flickr, Jay Galvin/Flickr, Justin van Dyke/Flickr hide caption

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La Caja China CEO Roberto Guerra. Guerra says his father first spotted the wooden cooking boxes in Havana's Chinatown in 1955. In 1985, the two decided to re-create the devices, and La Caja China company was born. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Why Miami Cubans Roast Christmas Pigs In A 'China Box'
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Phila Hach (standing, center) and her husband, Adolf Hach, are seen here with Minnie Pearl (right) of Grand Ole Opry fame, and an unidentified woman. "What the Grand Ole Opry did for country music, she has done for Southern food," one food writer wrote about Hach. Courtesy of the Hach Family hide caption

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Phila Hach, Who Spread The Gospel Of Southern Cuisine, Dies At 89
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'A Confederacy Of Dunces Cookbook': A Classic Revisited In Recipes
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Though it's considered a classic Midwestern dish, Green Bean Casserole was actually born in a Campbell's test kitchen in New Jersey 60 years ago. Love it or loathe it, the dish has come to mean more than just a mashup of processed food. Bill Hogan/TNS /Landov hide caption

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Green Bean Casserole: The Thanksgiving Staple We Love — Or Loathe
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Kolkata now has its first food truck: Agdum Bagdum. Its owners, two foodies who quit pharmaceutical jobs to become food truckers, were inspired by America's food truck craze — which, of course, was inspired by street food in places like Kolkata. Sandip Roy for NPR hide caption

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America's Food Truck Craze Parks On The Streets Of Kolkata
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Members of the women's suffrage movement prepare to march on New York's Wall Street in 1913, armed with leaflets and slogans demanding the vote for women. Paul Thompson/Getty Images hide caption

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Evelyn Birkby interviews guests on her KMA radio program, Down a Country Lane, in 1951 in Shenandoah, Iowa. Courtesy of University of Iowa Women's Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

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