Tour guide Ron Craig points to a photo in Jack Daniel's old office at the whiskey maker's distillery in Lynchburg, Tenn. The photo, taken in the 1890s, shows Jack Daniel (wearing a black-banded white hat and a gray goatee), seated next to an African-American man. He and a second African-American man (top left) are believed to be sons of Nearis Green, who may have helped teach Daniel his trade. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Jack Daniel's Heralds A Slave's Role In Its Origin Story

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Oil down, Grenada's national dish, is a melting pot of its cultural history. This hearty stew is made of local veggies, salted meat and aromatic spices. It's a dish prepared cookout-style at social gatherings, where everyone brings something to put into the pot. Scott Neuman for NPR hide caption

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The coffee cabinet is a Rhode Island staple. It's an ice cream beverage dating back to the World War II era. The ingredient list is pretty simple: It's just coffee syrup, ice cream and milk. John Bender/Rhode Island Public Radio hide caption

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What's In That Coffee Cabinet? A Delicious Taste Of Rhode Island History

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Jollof rice is the celebration dish of West Africa. At its basic, it includes rice, tomatoes, onions and chili peppers. But there are a zillion variations, depending on your country of origin, and the friendly rivalry can get intense over which version reigns supreme. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Jollof Rice: West Africans Dish It Up With A Hefty Serving Of Smack Talk

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Reiko Tsuzuki, 70, makes buckwheat soba noodles by hand in her restaurant kitchen in the Japanese island of Shikoku. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japan's Centuries-Old Tradition Of Making Soba Noodles

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In Italy and the U.S., restaurants are pledging to use sales of Amatrice's signature dish, spaghetti all' amatriciana, to raise funds for the devastated Italian town. Keith Beaty/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Harlan prepares Coney hot dogs at his restaurant, Red Hots Coney Island, in Detroit. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Coney: The Hot Dog That Fueled Detroit's Middle-Class Dreams

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For decades, Nitza Villapol hosted Cocina al Minuto, a popular cooking show in Cuba. In the decades after Fidel Castro took power, she adapted her cooking, teaching Cubans how to make do without certain ingredients while instructing them in how to use once-eschewed produce and cuts of meat in new ways. Screenshot from YouTube hide caption

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The 'Turkey' apricot, a hand-colored engraving after a drawing by Augusta Innes Withers (1792-1869), from the first volume of John Lindley's Pomological Magazine (1827-1828). The Romans dubbed the apricot the "precious one." Poets praised its beauty. The conquering Arabs took it to the Mideast, where the luxurious fruit was exploited in sugary confections. The Royal Horticultural Society Diary/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor discuss the court's food traditions. RBG let us in on a secret: The reason she was not entirely awake at the State of the Union? She wasn't totally sober. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Libyans are wary, but are enjoying a bit of normalcy at the new cafes that have sprung up in the past few months. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In The Midst Of Libya's Turmoil, New Cafes Spring Up To 'Change The Mood'

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Crepes are a cousin of the enchilada, says Mexican chef Pati Jinich. A vestige of French intervention in Mexico, crepes are now considered classics of Mexican gastronomy. (Above) Jinich's crepe enchiladas with corn, poblano chiles and squash in an avocado-tomatillo sauce. Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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A platter of falafel, kafta, french fries and other fare at Al Ameer Restaurant in Dearborn, Mich. The Mediterranean eatery will be recognized by the James Beard Awards this year in the "American Classics" category. Edsel Little/Flickr hide caption

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