Former Energy Minister Panagiotis Lafazanis speaks during a news conference at Parliament in Athens, Greece, on Friday. He's leading rebels who decided to break away from the ruling Syriza party over objections to an international bailout plan. Stoyan Nenov/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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A European Union (EU) flag flutters in front of the temple of the Parthenon in Athens, Greece, on Saturday. Finance ministers on Friday approved the first 26 billion euros ($29 billion) of a vast new bailout package for Greece. Yorgos Karahalis/AP hide caption

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Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras listens to Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos as Justice Minister Nikos Paraskevopoulos looks on during a parliamentary session in Athens on Thursday. Yiannakis Kourtoglou/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis reacts during a parliamentary session in Athens, earlier this week. In an interview with the BBC, Varoufakis said reforms in exchange for new bailout money "will fail." Christian Hartmann/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Some Greeks Are Finding Opportunity Amid Their Economy's Uncertainty

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After Tense Negotiations For Bailout, Will Greek Parliament Fall In Line?

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Greeks React To Deal With Relief, Frustration

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Finnish Finance Minister Alexander Stubb (right) speaks with Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos during a round table meeting of eurogroup finance ministers in Brussels on Sunday. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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The economic crisis in Greece has divided the country. Here, a pro-euro demonstrator shouts slogans as he holds a European Union flag in front of the Greek Parliament during a rally in Athens on Thursday. Petros Karadjias/AP hide caption

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Their Country In Turmoil, Some Greeks Now Lash Out At Each Other

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The drachma was Greece's currency before it joined the eurozone in 2001. There's now talk that Greece could leave the euro and return to its old currency, though economists say the transition would be difficult and the drachma would likely be extremely weak. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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German Finance Minister Wolfang Schaeuble frowns on a pro-no poster opposite graffiti that reads "no" in German — but also sounds like "yes" in Greek. The photo was taken in Athens on Sunday. Kay Nietfeld/DPA/Landov hide caption

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