Consuming anywhere from about 2,600 milligrams up to almost 5,000 milligrams of sodium per day is associated with more favorable health outcomes, according to a study. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Philadelphia is training owners of Chinese takeout restaurants to cut some of the salt in menu items like lo mein. Stephen Flood/Express-Times/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Flood/Express-Times/Landov

Eat less salt, but not too much less. iStockPhoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockPhoto.com

Is Eating Too Little Salt Risky? New Report Raises Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/183883415/184133838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nutrition fact labels are good but confusing, consumers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Prepacked foods marketed for toddlers can have extremely high levels of sodium compared to the 1,500-milligram daily limit recommended by the American Heart Association Daniel M.N. Turner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel M.N. Turner/NPR

Is The Coconut Water Craze All It's Cracked Up To Be?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155115477/155263953" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript