"Because he wasn't raised where health was an issue in the household. There was nobody talkin' about health, probably nobody talking about not smoking or drinking or unhealthy practices, what it could lead to. There was nobody talkin' about that." National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion hide caption

toggle caption National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Cargo/ImageZoo/Corbis

Long-Term Depression May Boost Stroke Risk Long After Mood Improves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/406502154/406633752" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Loretta Jackson gently stretches the hands of her sister, Shirlene English, to aid physical rehabilitation after Shirlene's brain aneurysm and stroke. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Two Sisters Share One's Road To Recovery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/327700561/328793829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andreas Fhager, a biomedical engineer at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, adjusts the Strokefinder device on a test subject's head. Gunilla Brocker hide caption

toggle caption Gunilla Brocker
/

The Blind Woman Who Sees Rain, But Not Her Daughter's Smile

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314621545/316110373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., gets help entering the Capitol from Vice President Joe Biden (right) in January 2013, one year after suffering a stroke at age 52. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Aspirin has been prescribed for decades as a simple way to reduce heart disease risk, but doctors still aren't sure how it works. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

The cause of strokes in younger people remains largely a mystery. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

Insomnia, feeling isolated, and bursts of anger are symptoms of the anxiety disorder known as PTSD. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

Japanese women drink green tea during an outdoor tea ceremony in Kobe, Japan. Making the brew a daily habit may be protective against stroke. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images

A Daily Habit Of Green Tea Or Coffee Cuts Stroke Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/174334493/174383294" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript