The University of Toronto's solar-powered pond aerator could help fish farmers in Bangladesh earn up to $250 of extra income a year. Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto hide caption

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Ousmane Ndiaye loves computer models, climate forecasting and babies. Here he holds farmer Mariami Keita's 4-month-old baby girl, Ndeye. Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS) hide caption

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The fruit of the baobab tree can be turned into a creamy juice. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Glass Of Juice Inspired A Town To Get Smart On Climate Change

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Calves at Butterworks Farm, an organic dairy farm in Vermont. Its owners are among the founding partners of Farmers to You, a startup that connects farmers in Vermont with customers in Boston. Sterling College/Flickr hide caption

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Pizza night on the Stoney Acres Farm in Athens, Wis. John Ivanko/Courtesy of Stoney Acres Farm hide caption

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Family Farms Turn To Pizza For Fast Cash And Customers

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Farmer Dave Alford can't fix his own tractors like this one because it's run by software with proprietary digital locks. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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DIY Tractor Repair Runs Afoul Of Copyright Law

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The city of Modesto's wastewater treatment plant could supply millions of gallons of water to local farmers in California. Lauren Sommer for NPR hide caption

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Drought-Stricken California Farmers Look To Tap Urban Wastewater

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Rudy Mussi's family has farmed in the Sacramento Delta region for nearly a century. Mussi worries that more water transfers will deplete the fragile Delta ecosystem and wipe out family farms like his. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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California's War Over Water Has Farmer Fighting Farmer

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An Indian National Congress party worker on Thursday pays tribute to Gajendra Singh, a farmer who committed suicide during a candlelight vigil in New Delhi the previous day. Rajay Gupta/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Three years ago, Air Force veteran Sara Creech quit her job as a nurse and bought a 43-acre farm in North Salem, Ind. She named her farm Blue Yonder Organic. John Wendle for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Tim Meyers on his four-acre vegetable farm in southwestern Alaska. Behind him: an endless sea of tundra, and a glimpse of the town of Bethel. Eugenie Frerichs for NPR hide caption

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Oranges sit in crates at the Rancho Del Sol Organics farm in San Diego County, Calif., in 2014. A labor dispute at major West Coast ports has left millions of pounds of California oranges stranded in warehouses and on half-loaded boats. Sam Hodgson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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In 2013, the U.S. imported about 2 million tons of Coronas and Modelos, making beer Mexico's largest agricultural export to the U.S., according to a USDA report. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Marya Gelvosa and Josh Gerritsen run a small farm on Maine's rocky mid-coast, providing their local community with beef, lamb and heritage poultry. They're decades younger than the average American farmer, but they love the lifestyle. "It's very fulfilling work," Gelvosa says. Josh Gerritsen/Donkey Universe Farm hide caption

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A Young Generation Sees Greener Pastures In Agriculture

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The drought forced many citrus farmers near Orange Cove, Calif., to mulch their trees because they couldn't afford to keep them alive. Recent rain and new groundwater regulations have eased the crisis, but only slightly. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Rain Eases California Drought Anxiety, If Not The Actual Drought

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The Carrolls, who once raised cattle, decided three decades ago to raise Christmas trees instead. The trees take seven to 12 years to mature. Courtesy of Claybrooke Farm hide caption

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Christmas Tree Farmers Invest Long-Term In The Holiday Spirit

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Like many beginning farmers, Grant Curtis wants to invest in his operation, but expectations of low prices are tying his hands. Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Cheap Crops Mean Tight Times For Midwest's Fledgling Farmers

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