Farmers are lobbying for the ability to buy software to fix their equipment, and some are hacking their way around the problem. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Farmers Look For Ways To Circumvent Tractor Software Locks

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Darvin Bentlage is a fourth-generation farmer from Golden City, Mo. He was uninsured before the ACA and featured in a video from the Department of Health and Human Services supporting the law. Screenshot/Department of Health and Human Services hide caption

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Screenshot/Department of Health and Human Services

Medical Bills Once Made Him Refinance The Farm. Could It Happen Again?

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Taylor Hutchinson says having subsidized health care costs has been critical to being able to start a farm with her partner, Jake Mendell. Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

Farmers and chefs looking for their perfect match at Bluejacket, a restaurant and brewery in Washington, D.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

'Speed Dating' For Farmers And Chefs: ISO A Perfect Local-Food Match

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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sweet potato consumption in the United States nearly doubled in just 15 years. U.S. Department Of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Who speaks for rural America? Farmers want international trade deals and relief from regulations. But small towns are focused on re-inventing themselves to attract a new generation. FrankvandenBergh/Getty Images hide caption

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FrankvandenBergh/Getty Images

Farmers Are Courting Trump, But They Don't Speak For All Of Rural America

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The theme of Mike's Maze this year is "See America," which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. Courtesy of Warner Farm hide caption

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Courtesy of Warner Farm

Andrew Heineman's twin brother, Marcus, pulls a cultivator across a different field where they will plant seed corn this year, another alternative they selected when the price of corn started to fall and a new seed corn plant opened up nearby. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics

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Beh paw Gaw is a New Roots graduate and a Karen refugee from Myanmar. Now she has her own three acre farm which she runs with her sister Pay lay, who is also a graduate of the New Roots program. Oluwakemi Aladesuyi/NPR hide caption

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Oluwakemi Aladesuyi/NPR

Refugees Plant The Seeds Of A New Community In Kansas City

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Karen (left) and Katie — still young girls at the time this photo was taken — sit with their father, Vern, on the family's tractor. Courtesy of Katie Jantzen hide caption

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Courtesy of Katie Jantzen

Facing A Shaky Future, Nebraska Family Farm Ponders A Renaissance

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Many farmers are selling unused or out-of-date equipment to make money in a year when grain prices are low. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

The University of Toronto's solar-powered pond aerator could help fish farmers in Bangladesh earn up to $250 of extra income a year. Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto hide caption

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Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto

Ousmane Ndiaye loves computer models, climate forecasting and babies. Here he holds farmer Mariami Keita's 4-month-old baby girl, Ndeye. Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS) hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS)

The fruit of the baobab tree can be turned into a creamy juice. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

How A Glass Of Juice Inspired A Town To Get Smart On Climate Change

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Calves at Butterworks Farm, an organic dairy farm in Vermont. Its owners are among the founding partners of Farmers to You, a startup that connects farmers in Vermont with customers in Boston. Sterling College/Flickr hide caption

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Sterling College/Flickr