organic farming organic farming

A farm worker runs a tine weeder on Jason Hunton's organic wheat crop. It's like a giant comb, scraping up weeds and bits of wheat along with it. Courtney Flatt/Northwest Public Radio hide caption

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Courtney Flatt/Northwest Public Radio

Tom Willey has farmed for decades in California's Central Valley. His farm, T&D Willey Farms, is in the process of being taken over by Food Commons Fresno. Willey plans to still help, advise and mentor. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

As California's Organic Farming Pioneers Age, A Younger Generation Steps In

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Dan Charles/NPR

By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

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Baby basil is planted in PVC piping through which nutrient-infused water flows at regular intervals at a hydroponics farm in Nevada. This week, the National Organic Standards Board is set to vote on whether foods grown hydroponically can be sold as "certified organic." Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

Some Growers Say Organic Label Will Be Watered Down If It Extends To Hydroponics

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Non-GMO eggs. (this photo is for promo only, not for the page) Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

Organic Food Fights Back Against 'Non-GMO' Rival

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An assortment of organic vegetables are seen on display. A growing body of evidence documents how farming methods can influence the nutritional content of foods. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The "Green Moms" group displays painted baby tubs during a June 2013 protest in Quezon, Philippines, showing opposition to the genetically modified rice variety "golden rice," which proponents promote as a solution to Vitamin A deficiency. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

Organic farmer Margot McMillen holds a grape leaf damaged by pesticide drift on her farm, Terra Bella Farm, in central Missouri. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Pesticide Drift Threatens Organic Farms

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"Who Gets Kissed" corn is a variety bred in Wisconsin specifically for organic farmers. It's named for an old game. At corn husking time, a lucky person who found a rare ear of corn with red kernels had the right to kiss anyone that he or she chose. Courtesy of Adrienne Shelton hide caption

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Courtesy of Adrienne Shelton

Pam Marrone (right), founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations, inspects some colonies of microbes. Marrone has spent most of her professional life prospecting for microbial pesticides and bringing them to market. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Mighty Farming Microbes: Companies Harness Bacteria To Give Crops A Boost

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Whole Foods says its new rating system is a way to talk to farmers and customers about issues that the organic rules don't encompass, like water, energy, labor and waste. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Organic Farmers Call Foul On Whole Foods' Produce Rating System

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Near the Danish city of Ikast, some 1,500 spectators gathered on April 19 to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday at organic dairy farms around Denmark. Courtesy of Organic Denmark hide caption

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Courtesy of Organic Denmark