The just-released Riverbelle is one of well over 100 new apple varieties to hit markets around the world in the past six years. Courtesy of Honeybear Brands hide caption

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A civet cat eats red coffee cherries at a farm in Bondowoso, Indonesia. Civets are actually more closely related to meerkats and mongooses than to cats. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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The Cotton Candy grape looks and smells like a regular green grape. But the taste will evoke memories of the circus. Courtesy of Spencer Gray hide caption

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The white egg yolk at left, seen next to a yellow yolk, may seem strange, but it's just a result of the chicken feed used, scientists say. Junko Kimura/Getty Images hide caption

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The Smitten Ice Cream shop in the Hayes Valley of San Francisco serves fresh ice cream with one novel ingredient: liquid nitrogen. The shop is located inside of a repurposed shipping container. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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When chef Heston Blumenthal was a kid, he wondered why people loved to dunk their biscuits into tea. Courtesy of the University of Nottingham hide caption

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Now we know why we'll never see a common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) sitting on a beet. Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A supermarket's dairy case with shelves of yogurt. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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High-Tech Shortcut To Greek Yogurt Leaves Purists Fuming

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Some extra-virgin olive oil is adulterated with lower-priced, lower-grade oils and artificial coloring along the supply chain without retailers or consumers ever knowing. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Research suggests that most of us don't or can't taste the subtleties of fine wines. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Most Of Us Just Can't Taste The Nuances In High-Priced Wines

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Astronauts may have a particular affinity for Tabasco sauce in space because their sense of smell and taste is distorted. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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Why Astronauts Crave Tabasco Sauce

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