Farmer Arif Subandi surveys scorched peat lands near his house in the village of Punggur Kecil in West Kalimantan Province on Borneo. Yosef Riadi for NPR hide caption

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Yosef Riadi for NPR

Indonesia's Peat Fires Still Blaze, But Not As Much As They Used To

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Steve Reed uses OhmConnect, a service that pays customers to lower their energy use at home during periods of high demand. Megan Wood/inewsource hide caption

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Megan Wood/inewsource

Energy Savings Can Be Fun, But No Need To Turn Off All The Lights

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Pollution has driven some families to leave Beijing. A group of Chinese lawyers is suing the governments of Beijing and its surrounding areas for not doing enough to get rid of the smog. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

For Some In China's Middle Class, Pollution Is Spurring Action

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Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Much of the nearly 180,000 gallons of crude oil spilled went into the Ash Coulee Creek, just 150 miles from the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp. Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health hide caption

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Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health

Pipeline Spill Adds To Concerns About Dakota Access Pipeline

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Land in the Red River Valley of Minnesota and North Dakota, as in much of the country, is dominated by farming. Richard Hamilton Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Hamilton Smith/Getty Images

A generally healthy and diverse assemblage of coral is seen (at left) within a grassy part of the inner reef flat of the Pag-asa Reef of the South China Sea. (At right) Coral has been killed after years of giant clam "chopper" boat operations on an unnamed reef to the east. John McManus/Rosenstiel School, University of Miami hide caption

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John McManus/Rosenstiel School, University of Miami

One Result Of China's Buildup In South China Sea: Environmental Havoc

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Dr. Gita Prakash (left), who runs a family clinic from her home in New Delhi, examines 10-year-old Sonu Kumar Chaudhary as his father, restaurant deliveryman Dilip Kumar Chaudhary, looks on. Prakash sees more and more cases of illness caused by the city's polluted air. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution

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Phan Sopheak, a rice farmer in Cambodia, rests shortly after a man wielding an axe attacked her. She had been patrolling the Prey Lang forest around her village with a volunteer group that is trying to stop illegal logging. Courtesy of Prey Lang Community Network hide caption

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Courtesy of Prey Lang Community Network

#EarthDay: The High Cost Of Eco-Activism

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A photo taken in 2005 shows the Hawai'i Island rainforest before it succumbed to Rapid 'ōhi'a Death. J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i hide caption

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J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i

Rapid 'Ōhi'a Death: The Disease That's Killing Native Hawaiian Trees

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A sign at the Westside Diner in Flint, Mich., reassures customers that it serves uncontaminated water pulled from Detroit's drinking supply. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Tests Say The Water Is Safe. But Flint's Restaurants Still Struggle

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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

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The Heartland Biogas facility in Weld County, Colo., is one of the country's largest waste treatment plants that converts methane to natural gas. Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy hide caption

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Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy

From Poop To Power: Colorado Explores New Sources Of Renewable Energy

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An employee drags a palette of recently returned goods through the Optoro warehouse so they can be processed. Dianna Douglas/NPR hide caption

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Dianna Douglas/NPR

Maryland Startup Redirects River Of Rejected Gifts

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A conference attendee looks at a projection of the Earth on Monday, the opening day of the COP 21 United Nations conference on climate change, in Le Bourget, on the outskirts of Paris. Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images

Businesses Awaken To The Opportunities Of Action On Climate Change

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