A generally healthy and diverse assemblage of coral is seen (at left) within a grassy part of the inner reef flat of the Pag-asa Reef of the South China Sea. (At right) Coral has been killed after years of giant clam "chopper" boat operations on an unnamed reef to the east. John McManus/Rosenstiel School, University of Miami hide caption

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John McManus/Rosenstiel School, University of Miami

One Result Of China's Buildup In South China Sea: Environmental Havoc

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Dr. Gita Prakash (left), who runs a family clinic from her home in New Delhi, examines 10-year-old Sonu Kumar Chaudhary as his father, restaurant deliveryman Dilip Kumar Chaudhary, looks on. Prakash sees more and more cases of illness caused by the city's polluted air. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution

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Phan Sopheak, a rice farmer in Cambodia, rests shortly after a man wielding an axe attacked her. She had been patrolling the Prey Lang forest around her village with a volunteer group that is trying to stop illegal logging. Courtesy of Prey Lang Community Network hide caption

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Courtesy of Prey Lang Community Network

#EarthDay: The High Cost Of Eco-Activism

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A photo taken in 2005 shows the Hawai'i Island rainforest before it succumbed to Rapid 'ōhi'a Death. J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i hide caption

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J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i

Rapid 'Ōhi'a Death: The Disease That's Killing Native Hawaiian Trees

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A sign at the Westside Diner in Flint, Mich., reassures customers that it serves uncontaminated water pulled from Detroit's drinking supply. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Tests Say The Water Is Safe. But Flint's Restaurants Still Struggle

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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

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The Heartland Biogas facility in Weld County, Colo., is one of the country's largest waste treatment plants that converts methane to natural gas. Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy hide caption

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Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy

From Poop To Power: Colorado Explores New Sources Of Renewable Energy

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An employee drags a palette of recently returned goods through the Optoro warehouse so they can be processed. Dianna Douglas/NPR hide caption

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Dianna Douglas/NPR

Maryland Startup Redirects River Of Rejected Gifts

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A conference attendee looks at a projection of the Earth on Monday, the opening day of the COP 21 United Nations conference on climate change, in Le Bourget, on the outskirts of Paris. Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Businesses Awaken To The Opportunities Of Action On Climate Change

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The Beijing Environment Exchange, one of seven emissions trading pilot programs in China, may be part of a nationwide carbon market by as early as 2017. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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China Plans To Create A Nationwide Carbon Market By 2017

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Sebastian Preuber/Flickr; Daniel Ramirez/Flickr

A sample of Georgian from the UCLA Phonetics Lab

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Elizeu Berçacola, a leader of a group of rubber tappers in Machadinho d'Oeste in the Brazilian state of Rondonia, just after burring down three illegal logging camps. There is a war over the future of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil: those that are fighting it call it 'the war over wood.' Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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"I think there's a move that needs to be made toward accelerating what's already inevitable, which is a clean-energy transition that'll create jobs, safeguard our environment and reduce our dependence on foreign oil," Jay Faison told NPR. Courtesy ClearPath hide caption

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Courtesy ClearPath

Residents of Flint, Mich. (shown here in January), have been protesting the quality and cost of the city's tap water for more than a year. Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

High Lead Levels In Michigan Kids After City Switches Water Source

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