A truck carrying hardwood timber drives along a rural road leading to Paragominas, Brazil, on Sept. 23, 2011. The city has become a pioneering "Green City," a model of sustainability with a new economic approach that has seen illegal deforestation virtually halted. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

A condemned house in the Ocean Breeze area of New York City's Staten Island. Most homes in the seaside community were inundated by the ocean surge from superstorm Sandy. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Former South Carolina Republican Rep. Bob Inglis now runs the Energy and Enterprise Initiative. /Energy and Enterprise Initiative hide caption

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/Energy and Enterprise Initiative

New Groups Make A Conservative Argument On Climate Change

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The Michigan Gala apples on this packing line will soon be in short supply. After a mild fall and winter, then a late-April freeze, Michigan's apple cultivation has dropped 90 percent. Noah Adams/NPR hide caption

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Noah Adams/NPR

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

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Attendees of Apple's 2012 World Wide Developers Conference look at the new MacBook Pro with Retina display. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Apple's Change Of Heart On Green Certification

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GED = gross external damages from pollution.

Environmental Accounting for Pollution hide caption

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Environmental Accounting for Pollution

Will Economic Growth Destroy The Planet?

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