Google wants to pump 1.5 million gallons of water per day to cool servers at its data center in Berkeley County, S.C. "It's great to have Google in this region," conservationist Emily Cedzo said. "So by no means are we going after Google ... Our concern, primarily, is the source of that water." Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Google Moves In And Wants To Pump 1.5 Million Gallons Of Water Per Day

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Motorcyclists enter the Carrizo Plain National Monument near Taft, Calif., during a wildflower "super bloom" on Wednesday. After years of drought, an explosion of wildflowers in Southern and Central California is drawing record crowds. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

In its prime, the Hero sailed through frigid temperatures and ice-strewn waters in the South Pole. But now it's sinking, leaking oil and threatening Washington's oysters. Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Farmer Arif Subandi surveys scorched peat lands near his house in the village of Punggur Kecil in West Kalimantan Province on Borneo. Yosef Riadi for NPR hide caption

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Yosef Riadi for NPR

Indonesia's Peat Fires Still Blaze, But Not As Much As They Used To

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Steve Reed uses OhmConnect, a service that pays customers to lower their energy use at home during periods of high demand. Megan Wood/inewsource hide caption

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Megan Wood/inewsource

Energy Savings Can Be Fun, But No Need To Turn Off All The Lights

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Pollution has driven some families to leave Beijing. A group of Chinese lawyers is suing the governments of Beijing and its surrounding areas for not doing enough to get rid of the smog. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

For Some In China's Middle Class, Pollution Is Spurring Action

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Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Much of the nearly 180,000 gallons of crude oil spilled went into the Ash Coulee Creek, just 150 miles from the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp. Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health hide caption

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Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health

Pipeline Spill Adds To Concerns About Dakota Access Pipeline

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