A second big study affirms new thinking: Exposing high-risk kids to peanuts beginning in infancy greatly reduces the chance of developing a peanut allergy. And this peanut tolerance holds up as kids get older. iStockphoto hide caption

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Peanut Mush In Infancy Cuts Allergy Risk. New Study Adds To Evidence
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Former Peanut Corporation of America President Stewart Parnell was sentenced to 28 years in prison for knowingly shipping salmonella-tainted peanut butter, which was linked to the deaths of nine people. Don Petersen/AP hide caption

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In a landmark new study, researchers found that babies who consumed the equivalent of about 4 heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting when they were between 4 and 11 months old, were about 80 percent less likely to develop a peanut allergy by age 5. To avoid a choking hazard, doctors say kids should be fed peanuts mixed in other foods, not peanuts or globs of peanut butter. Anna/Flickr hide caption

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Feeding Babies Foods With Peanuts Appears To Prevent Allergies
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Stewart Parnell (center), former president of the now-defunct Peanut Corp. of America, is one of four executives indicted over a 2009 outbreak of salmonella. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Peanut Firm Executives Indicted Over 2009 Salmonella Outbreak
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A still-trim Elvis Presley enjoys a sandwich in 1958. His love of fatty foods hadn't caught up to him yet. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Elvis Left The Building Long Ago, But His Food (And Music) Lives On
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Farmworkers like these in California picking produce may soon be required by the FDA to take more precautions against spreading foodborne illness. Heather Craig/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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FDA Releases Rules To Strengthen Safety Of Food Supply
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In Haiti, Aid Groups Squabble Over Rival Peanut Butter Factories
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Peanut butter prices are up — and likely to increase again. Edward Todd/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Pricier PB&J's In The Forecast, Thanks To Peanut Shortage
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