Most people in the world have never experienced the taste of the kind of tortillas Hilda Pastor makes using heirloom corn. That's because of the rise of mass-produced instant corn flour. Marisa Peñaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza/NPR

Driscoll's, the largest berry producer in the world, now grows about the same quantity of raspberries and strawberries in Mexico as it does in California. Many American producers have recently expanded their production to Mexico. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why Ditching NAFTA Could Hurt America's Farmers More Than Mexico's

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Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville, Ill. A thriving American Indian city that rose to prominence after A.D. 900 owing to successful maize farming, it may have collapsed because of changing climate. Michael Dolan/Flickr hide caption

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Michael Dolan/Flickr

Jennifer Gleason (left) and Alice Melendez, who's growing Hickory King heirloom corn on her farm to help Gleason make corn chips. Noah Adams/NPR hide caption

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Noah Adams/NPR

From Farm To Distillery, Heirloom Corn Varieties Are Sweet Treasures

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Like many beginning farmers, Grant Curtis wants to invest in his operation, but expectations of low prices are tying his hands. Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

Cheap Crops Mean Tight Times For Midwest's Fledgling Farmers

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Sunlight streams into a corn storage building at a Michlig Grain storage facility in Sheffield, Illinois, U.S., on Oct. 31, 2014. The price of corn has been falling for months. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why Farmers Aren't Cheering This Year's Monster Harvest

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The Illinois State Corn Husking Competition is one of nine competitions happening during harvest season all across the Midwest. Abby Wendle /NPR hide caption

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Abby Wendle /NPR

Once A Year, Farmers Go Back To Picking Corn By Hand — For Fun

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Dan Selvig says wetter conditions helped convince his family to shift their plantings to corn. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

Shifting Climate Has North Dakota Farmers Swapping Wheat For Corn

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Farmer Seth Watkins (left) and agronomist Matt Liebman stand amid native prairie grasses near Des Moines, Iowa. The conservation strip is used to stop soil erosion. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

Iowa's Corn Farmers Learn To Adapt To Weather Extremes

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A corn purchaser writes on his account in northwest China in 2012. In November 2013, officials began rejecting imports of U.S. corn when they detected traces of a new gene not yet approved in China. Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov

Wheat fields like this one could yield wheat with less zinc and iron in the future if they are exposed to higher levels of CO2, according to the journal Nature. Zaharov Evgeniy/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Zaharov Evgeniy/iStockphoto.com

Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

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Adam Cole/NPR

From Aztecs To Oscars: Popcorn's Beautiful, Explosive Journey

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Seed corn sits in the hopper of a planter. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images