The condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is inherited and can be a killer. But some of the genetic mutations once thought linked to the illness are actually harmless, geneticists say. Afton Almaraz/Getty Images hide caption

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Afton Almaraz/Getty Images

Study Of Sudden Cardiac Death Exposes Limits Of Genetic Testing

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Genetically modified mosquitoes are released in Piracicaba, Brazil, in an effort to combat Zika virus. These mosquitoes were modified using conventional techniques. Victor Moriyama/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Getty Images

New Genetic Engineering Method Called Promising — And Perilous

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Zunika Crenshaw helps her 3-year-old daughter Jhase Crenshaw Bass with an asthma inhaler. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Scientists Seek Genetic Clues To Asthma's Toll On Black Children

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Milo Lorentzen is 5 years old, and is one of only three people in the world known to have a mutation in a gene called KDM1A. Courtesy of Karen Park hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen Park
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Scientists Say They Hope To Create A Human Genome In The Lab

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The Power Of Genes, And The Line Between Biology And Destiny

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When Erika Stallings was 22, she found out that she might have a genetic mutation that greatly increased her risk of cancer. Misha Friedman for NPR hide caption

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Misha Friedman for NPR

More People Seek Genetic Testing, But There Aren't Enough Counselors

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A lucky few stay healthy despite carrying genetic defects linked to serious diseases. What protects them? Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

How Do 'Genetic Superheroes' Overcome Their Bad DNA?

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Rough night? Depending on specific tweaks to their genes, some fruit flies have trouble falling asleep, and others can't stay asleep. Getting too little shut-eye hurts their memory. David M. Phillips/Science Source hide caption

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David M. Phillips/Science Source

How Research On Sleepless Fruit Flies Could Help Human Insomniacs

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The area around the confluence of the Silverthrone and Klinaklini glaciers in southwestern British Columbia provides a glimpse into how the terrain traveled by Native Americans in Pleistocene times may have appeared. David J. Meltzer/Science hide caption

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David J. Meltzer/Science

2 Gene Studies Suggest First Migrants To Americas A Complex Mix

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Mammoths had a distinctive version of a gene known to play a role in sensing outside temperature, moderating the biology of fat and regulating hair growth. That bit of DNA likely helped mammoths thrive in cold weather, scientists say. Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University

Checking DNA Against Elephants Hints At How Mammoths Got Woolly

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This clay facial reconstruction of Kennewick Man, who died about 8,500 years ago in what's now southeast Washington, was based on forensic scientists' study of the morphological features of his skull. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution

DNA Confirms Kennewick Man's Genetic Ties To Native Americans

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This fungus among us — baker's yeast, aka Saccharomyces cerevisiae — is useful for more than just making bread. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

You And Yeast Have More In Common Than You Might Think

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Psyched that it's finally spring? Shifts in the season may affect more than your mood. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

Seasons May Tweak Genes That Trigger Some Chronic Diseases

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