This clay facial reconstruction of Kennewick Man, who died about 8,500 years ago in what's now southeast Washington, was based on forensic scientists' study of the morphological features of his skull. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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This fungus among us — baker's yeast, aka Saccharomyces cerevisiae — is useful for more than just making bread. iStockphoto hide caption

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Psyched that it's finally spring? Shifts in the season may affect more than your mood. Corbis hide caption

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iStockphoto

For someone 2.5 inches shorter than average, the risk of coronary artery disease increases by about 13.5 percent, scientists found. PW Illustration/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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The H1N1 swine flu virus kills some people, while others don't get very sick at all. A genetic variation offers one clue. Centre For Infections/Health Pro/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Centre For Infections/Health Pro/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

The size of the brain of a chimpanzee (right) is considerably smaller than that of a human brain. Probably multiple stretches of DNA help determine that, geneticists say. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Researcher Svante Pääbo, was able to extract a complete genome from this ancient human leg bone. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

itoggle caption Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues found an enzyme in bacteria that makes editing DNA in animal cells much easier. Cailey Cotner/UC Berkeley hide caption

itoggle caption Cailey Cotner/UC Berkeley

A technician tests samples from Ebola-infected patients at a field lab, run by Doctors Without Borders, in Kailahun, Sierra Leone. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

The human Y chromosome (left) holds the code for "maleness"; that's the X on the right. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Andrew Syred/Science Source
Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Corbis

Being able to insert the two man-made letters into DNA, alongside the usual four-letter alphabet, could teach old cells new tricks and lead to better drugs, researchers say. courtesy of Synthorx hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of Synthorx

Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. iStockphoto hide caption

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