Researcher Svante Pääbo, was able to extract a complete genome from this ancient human leg bone. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

itoggle caption Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues found an enzyme in bacteria that makes editing DNA in animal cells much easier. Cailey Cotner/UC Berkeley hide caption

itoggle caption Cailey Cotner/UC Berkeley

A technician tests samples from Ebola-infected patients at a field lab, run by Doctors Without Borders, in Kailahun, Sierra Leone. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Being able to insert the two man-made letters into DNA, alongside the usual four-letter alphabet, could teach old cells new tricks and lead to better drugs, researchers say. courtesy of Synthorx hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of Synthorx

Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes. Mary Levin/University of Washington hide caption

itoggle caption Mary Levin/University of Washington

Up till now, all babies have had two genetic parents. That could soon change. Klöpper & Eisenschmidt GbR/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Klöpper & Eisenschmidt GbR/iStockphoto