While some scientists seek ways to stop the spread of Zika by mosquitoes, others have received new funding from the National Institutes of Health to track the genes and habits of the virus itself. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Virus Profilers Race To Figure Out What Makes Zika Tick
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Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are displayed at an exhibition on Jan. 28 in Brazil. The mosquitoes can be carriers of the Zika virus. Several cases of the virus have spread to Puerto Rico. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Puerto Rico Health Official 'Very Concerned' About Zika's Spread
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Nancy Writebol, a missionary who recovered from Ebola she contracted in Liberia in 2014, told a reporter last July that she was still experiencing knee pain and hadn't fully regained her energy. Chris Keane/Getty Images hide caption

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Wherever You Go, Your Personal Cloud Of Microbes Follows
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Scientists think the lone star tick (center) likely transmits Heartland disease to people. And the virus probably also circulates in deer and coyotes. iStockphoto; CDC; iStockphoto hide caption

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A blood test developed by Harvard researchers checks for evidence of past infection with more than a thousand strains of virus, from about 200 virus families. The swine flu virus shown here, A/CA/4/09, rarely infects humans. C. S. Goldsmith/CDC hide caption

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How Many Viruses Have Infected You?
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Augustine Goba (right) heads the laboratory at Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. He and colleagues analyzed the viral genetics in blood samples from 78 Ebola patients early in the epidemic. Stephen Gire/AP hide caption

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Could This Virus Be Good For You?
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Biologist Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project, recently moved the project to the University of California, San Diego's School of Medicine. Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado hide caption

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Ecologists found signs of Ebola in a Rousettus leschenaultii fruit bat. These bats are widespread across south Asia, from India to China. Kevin Olival/EcoHealth Alliance hide caption

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Where Could Ebola Strike Next? Scientists Hunt Virus In Asia
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A woman protects her child's face in Managua, Nicaragua, as health workers fumigate for mosquitoes that carry chikungunya. The virus started spreading through Nicaragua and Mexico in the fall. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Painful Virus Sweeps Central America, Gains A Toehold In U.S.
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The dengue virus has an icosahedral shape, similar to the pattern on a soccer ball. Antibodies stop the virus by binding to its surface. Laguna Design/Science Source hide caption

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Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries
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Caribous doing their business in mountain ice have left a viral record hundreds of years old. Courtesy of Brian Moorman hide caption

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Ancient Viruses Lurk In Frozen Caribou Poo
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We are all Russian nesting dolls: Our intestines house many bacteria, which house many viruses. These so-called bacteriophages are likely as important for our health as the bacteria they live in. Lisa Brown for NPR hide caption

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France has banned imports of live pigs and other products from the U.S. to keep out a virus that has killed more than 4 million pigs in the U.S. Here, young pigs look out of a pen at a North Dakota hog farm in a 2005 file photo. Will Kincaid/AP hide caption

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Daniel Horowitz for NPR
Contagious Aphrodisiac? Virus Makes Crickets Have More Sex
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Fearful of catching the MERS virus, workers wear masks during a soccer match on April 22 at King Fahad stadium in Riyadh. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why The U.S. Is Worried About A Deadly Middle Eastern Virus
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