Massachusetts composting companies like City Soil, which turn food waste into compost that can be used on gardens and farms, say they expect to get quite a bit of new business from the food waste ban. Courtesy of City Soil hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of City Soil

The rendering industry likes to call itself the world's oldest recycling system. Nearly 100 percent of processed pigs will eventually get used — as meat and in uses as varied as medicine and pet food. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Ready-to-eat meals found in the prepared food aisle are a growing source of waste, as it is difficult to reuse meals that aren't sold but are fully cooked. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

itoggle caption Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Students are given healthy choices on a lunch line at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. To keep students from tossing out the fruits and vegetables they're served, researchers say it helps to give them a choice in what they put on their trays. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Hans Pennink/AP

Bounty from the bin: Thaler says you can find plenty of tasty, edible produce that's tossed out. Plastic-wrapped produce tends to be a safe bet, he says. Courtesy of Maximus Thaler hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Maximus Thaler

A strawberry vanilla WikiPearl made with Stonyfield frozen yogurt. Stonyfield and WikiPearl, Inc. hide caption

itoggle caption Stonyfield and WikiPearl, Inc.

There may not be a pot of gold at the end of these rainbows, but there is an anaerobic digestion facility turning food waste into energy at Jordan Dairy Farm in Rutland, Mass. Randy Jordan/Massachusetts Clean Energy Center/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Randy Jordan/Massachusetts Clean Energy Center/Flickr

Throwing out a pound of boneless beef effectively wastes 24 times more calories than throwing out a pound of vegetables or grains. Egg and dairy products fall somewhere between the two extremes. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Morgan Walker/NPR

Europeans throw away 90 million tons of food each year, including these vegetables pulled from waste bins of an organic supermarket in Berlin. A new German website aims to connect surplus food with people who want it. Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters /Landov

The digester eggs at Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brooklyn contain millions of gallons of black sludge. Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection

Roger Gordon (left) is offered a box of bananas from a worker who was throwing away the lightly speckled fruit at Mexican Fruits in Washington, D.C. Gordon's startup, Food Cowboy, works with truckers to divert edible produce from landfills to food charities. Serri Graslie/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Serri Graslie/NPR

Tristram Stuart, founder of Feeding the 5000, is helping to organize several disco soup events across Europe for World Food Day. /Courtesy of Feeding the 5000 hide caption

itoggle caption /Courtesy of Feeding the 5000

Doug Rauch wants to take wholesome food that grocers have to throw away and cook and sell it as low-cost, prepared meals. Bunnyhero/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Bunnyhero/Flickr

At her bakery in Costa Mesa, Calif., Rachel Klemek sells cabernet brownies made with a flour substitute derived from grape pomace, a byproduct of winemaking packed with nutrients known as polyphenols. Mariana Dale/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Mariana Dale/NPR

Compost bins at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket in Brooklyn, N.Y. are part of a pilot program to get New Yorkers to recycle their food waste. Courtesy of Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket

A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer in Florida City, Fla. Much of the lost and wasted weight in fruits and vegetables is water, according to a report by the World Resources Institute. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Got spaghetti? Dogs digest starch more efficiently than their wolf ancestors, which may have been an important step during dog domestication. Lauren Solomon/iStockphoto.com/Nicholas Moore /Courtesy of Nature hide caption

itoggle caption Lauren Solomon/iStockphoto.com/Nicholas Moore /Courtesy of Nature