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For six months, filmmakers Grant Baldwin and Jen Rustemeyer vowed to eat only food entering the waste stream. They document their experiment, and the problem of food waste, in Just Eat It. Courtesy of Pure Souls Media hide caption

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Courtesy of Pure Souls Media

In 'Just Eat It,' Filmmakers Feast For 6 Months On Discarded Food

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"Asparagus Shortcake," a leftover creation from The Cook's Book published in 1908. Special Collections/Michigan State University Libraries hide caption

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Special Collections/Michigan State University Libraries

The History Of Our Love-Hate-Love Relationship With Leftovers

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Most fruits and vegetables — particularly after being cut — store better in an airtight container, Gunders says. And it's best to store them in see-through containers so we don't forget about them. USDA hide caption

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USDA

The government's first ever national target to reduce food waste will encourage farmers to donate more of their imperfect produce to the hungry. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

It's Time To Get Serious About Reducing Food Waste, Feds Say

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Copenhagen, Denmark - October 11, 2014: fruits and vegetables stalls at market in Copenhagen. Customers are choosing goods for themselves. These stalls is located between market halls where one can find over 60 stands with everything from fresh fish and meat, as well as small places to get a quick bite. It is located near Nørreport metro station. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

United has purchased 15 million gallons of renewable jet fuel made from beef tallow, or fat, by Alt Air Fuels and plans to use the fuel this year for Los Angeles-to-San Francisco flights. Tony Ruppe/United hide caption

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Tony Ruppe/United

Galdakao Mayor Ibon Uribe (left) and volunteer Javier Goikoetxea pose in front of the Solidarity Fridge, Spain's first communal refrigerator, shared by citizens in Galdakao, a city outside Bilbao. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

To Cut Food Waste, Spain's Solidarity Fridge Supplies Endless Leftovers

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Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices. Courtesy of Imperfect Produce hide caption

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Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

Cesar Zuniga, operations manager at the Salinas Valley municipal dump in California, points to salad greens that still have two weeks before their sell-by date. "Some loads ... look very fresh," Zuniga says. "We question, wow, why is this being tossed?" Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Landfill Of Lettuce: Why Were These Greens Tossed Before Their Time?

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This Alaskan cod taco with pickled radish salsa is one of several drought-friendly recipes that chef Nathan Lyon and his culinary manager, Sarah Forman, have cooked up. Courtesy of Sarah Forman hide caption

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Courtesy of Sarah Forman

Noemi Sosa shops at Daily Table, a nonprofit supermarket in Dorchester, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Trader Joe's Ex-President Opens Store With Aging Food And Cheap Meals

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The Mariposa border crossing, as seen from Nogales, Ariz., September 2013. This land port serves as the main point of entry into the U.S. for fresh produce from Mexico. A lot of that produce gets rejected just past the border, even though it's perfectly tasty and edible. David Kadlubowski/Corbis hide caption

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David Kadlubowski/Corbis

Lunch, Not Landfill: Nonprofit Rescues Produce Rejected At U.S. Border

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Not so ugly, eh? Supposedly imperfect produce rescued and reclaimed for consumption by Bon Appetit and Better Harvests. Far left and far right: Courtesy of Ron Clark/Better Harvests. Center three images: Courtesy of Bon Appétit Management Company hide caption

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Far left and far right: Courtesy of Ron Clark/Better Harvests. Center three images: Courtesy of Bon Appétit Management Company