Compost bins at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket in Brooklyn, N.Y. are part of a pilot program to get New Yorkers to recycle their food waste. Courtesy of Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket hide caption

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Composting On The Way Up In New York City High-Rises
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A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer in Florida City, Fla. Much of the lost and wasted weight in fruits and vegetables is water, according to a report by the World Resources Institute. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Got spaghetti? Dogs digest starch more efficiently than their wolf ancestors, which may have been an important step during dog domestication. Lauren Solomon/iStockphoto.com/Nicholas Moore /Courtesy of Nature hide caption

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A 1,000-pound butter sculpture is unveiled at the 97th Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg last week. Bradley C. Bower/AP hide caption

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This Butter Sculpture Could Power A Farm For 3 Days
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The Austrians behind Waste Cooking want to show the culinary possibilities of food that ends up in the trash. Courtesy Wastecooking.com hide caption

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Charlotte Douglas International Airport has deployed an army of 1.9 million worms to eat through its organic waste. The airport has reduced the trash it sends to the landfill by 70 percent. Julie Rose hide caption

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One Airport's Trash Is 2 Million Worms' Treasure
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Glen Osterberg (right) and another line cook at Lupa learn how to use the LeanPath waste tracking software. Eliza Barclay/NPR hide caption

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No Simple Recipe For Weighing Food Waste At Mario Batali's Lupa
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The National Restaurant Association says getting restaurants to focus on the food waste problem is a big challenge. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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For Restaurants, Food Waste Is Seen As Low Priority
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Most of the gleaming steel tanks outside Fage's yogurt factory hold milk. One, however, holds the yogurt byproduct whey. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Why Greek Yogurt Makers Want Whey To Go Away
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Tim Opper, of Cabot Cheese, inspects equipment that separates whey protein from sugar in the company's whey processing plant. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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You Can Thank A Whey Refinery For That Protein Smoothie
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Portland-based GO Box, a service that provides and cleans reusable take-out boxes for local food trucks, hopes to keep some of the city's food waste from going in the dumpster. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Grocery auctions have been growing in popularity as a way to get a lot of food for not a lot of money. Matt Sindelar for NPR hide caption

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Willing To Play The Dating Game With Your Food? Try A Grocery Auction
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