Seattle garbage collector Anousone Sadettanh empties a small residential garbage bin into his truck in 2014. It is now illegal to toss out food with the trash in the city. Residents will get warning tags for now; the city will start imposing fines in July. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Elaine Thompson/AP

Sherri Erkel and her daughter, Asa, cook dinner in their kitchen in Iowa City, Iowa. The Erkel family is part of an EPA study measuring the amount of food wasted in U.S. homes. Pat Aylward/NET News hide caption

itoggle caption Pat Aylward/NET News

Massachusetts composting companies like City Soil, which turn food waste into compost that can be used on gardens and farms, say they expect to get quite a bit of new business from the food waste ban. Courtesy of City Soil hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of City Soil

The rendering industry likes to call itself the world's oldest recycling system. Nearly 100 percent of processed pigs will eventually get used — as meat and in uses as varied as medicine and pet food. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Ready-to-eat meals found in the prepared food aisle are a growing source of waste, as it is difficult to reuse meals that aren't sold but are fully cooked. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

itoggle caption Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Students are given healthy choices on a lunch line at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. To keep students from tossing out the fruits and vegetables they're served, researchers say it helps to give them a choice in what they put on their trays. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Hans Pennink/AP

Bounty from the bin: Thaler says you can find plenty of tasty, edible produce that's tossed out. Plastic-wrapped produce tends to be a safe bet, he says. Courtesy of Maximus Thaler hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Maximus Thaler

A strawberry vanilla WikiPearl made with Stonyfield frozen yogurt. Stonyfield and WikiPearl, Inc. hide caption

itoggle caption Stonyfield and WikiPearl, Inc.

There may not be a pot of gold at the end of these rainbows, but there is an anaerobic digestion facility turning food waste into energy at Jordan Dairy Farm in Rutland, Mass. Randy Jordan/Massachusetts Clean Energy Center/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Randy Jordan/Massachusetts Clean Energy Center/Flickr

Throwing out a pound of boneless beef effectively wastes 24 times more calories than throwing out a pound of vegetables or grains. Egg and dairy products fall somewhere between the two extremes. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Morgan Walker/NPR

Europeans throw away 90 million tons of food each year, including these vegetables pulled from waste bins of an organic supermarket in Berlin. A new German website aims to connect surplus food with people who want it. Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters /Landov