T.J. Plenty Chief stands in front of one of the three semitrucks owned by his company, Red Road Trucking. The trucks operate in the Fort Berthold reservation oil fields, carrying everything from gravel to pipe to water needed for drilling. His business is based on the reservation, in New Town, N.D., where he lives. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio

Upstream From Standing Rock, Tribes Balance Benefits, Risks Of Oil Industry

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An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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A fireball goes up at the site of an oil train derailment in Casselton, N.D., in this Dec. 30 photo. The fiery crash left an ominous cloud over the town and led some residents to evacuate. Bruce Crummy/AP hide caption

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Bruce Crummy/AP

Fiery Oil-Train Derailments Prompt Calls For Less Flammable Oil

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