Ricardo "Cobe" Williams, wearing the cap, served time for attempted murder before joining CeaseFire as a "violence interrupter." Above, he talks with Lil Mikey in a scene from the documentary The Interrupters. Lil Mikey, who'd also been in prison, went on to become an outreach worker with the organization. Aaron Wickenden/Courtesy of Kartemquin Films hide caption

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Jenny Tenorio Gallegos, 35, in Lima, Peru, is being treated for drug-resistant TB. The treatment lasts two years and may rob her of her hearing. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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She's Got One Of The Toughest Diseases To Cure. And She's Hopeful

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Fake medicines are a 21st-century scourge, but they've been around for a long time. This advertising trade card for snake oil was printed in New York City around 1880. Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Carmen Castro, 46, of Lima, Peru, is a survivor of MDR-TB — multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Partners In Health treated her and loaned her money to open a small store. "Because of my TB and thanks to God and Partners In Health, now I have my own business," she says. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Polina, 37, rests in a hospital bed in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2011. She is severely malnourished and suffers from numerous diseases, including tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV. Misha Friedman hide caption

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An X-ray of the chest of a man with tuberculosis. The areas infected with TB bacteria are colored red. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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In New York, Video Chat Trumps Quarantine To Combat TB

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Domitilia, 57, is a diabetic patient in the Dominican Republic who contracted tuberculosis. She's now cured of TB after two years of treatment. Javier Galeano/The Union hide caption

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Two young girls, part of the wave of unaccompanied children who've illegally entered the U.S., watch a soccer match at the Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Arizona. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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An Indian woman takes tuberculosis pills at a clinic in Mumbai. More than 700 Indians die from TB each day. That's one death every two minutes. Pal Pillai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A pregnant Somali woman gets a tetanus shot at a clinic in Mogadishu in 2013. The vaccination initiative was launched by the GAVI Alliance, UNICEF and the World Health Organization. Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love while living at a tuberculosis ward in Balti, Moldova. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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To Save Her Husband's Life, A Woman Fights For Access To TB Drugs

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Signs of tuberculosis have been found in ancient Egyptian mummies, such as this one in London's British Museum. Klafubra/Wikimedia.org hide caption

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Children with tuberculosis sleep outside at Springfield House Open Air School in London in 1932. Like sanatoriums, these schools offered TB sufferers a place to receive the top treatment of the day: fresh air and sunshine. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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