A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Carmen Black (left) took over a farm in Iowa last year. Don Bustos has been farming in New Mexico for decades. Maja Black/Courtesy of Carmen Black; Courtesy of Don Bustos hide caption

toggle caption
Maja Black/Courtesy of Carmen Black; Courtesy of Don Bustos

What To Expect When You're Expecting To Own A Farm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527051948/527640487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The avocados on the right are Hass, America's favorite variety of the green fruit. At left are GEM avocados, the great-granddaughter of the Hass. GEM avocados grow well in California's Central Valley and, in taste tests, they scored better than the Hass in terms of eating quality. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

What remains of the home of O.T. Jackson, the founder of Dearfield, Colo., sits on the town site in rural Weld County. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Farmers are lobbying for the ability to buy software to fix their equipment, and some are hacking their way around the problem. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Perlman/AP

Farmers Look For Ways To Circumvent Tractor Software Locks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523024776/523203766" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences students Liz Hada, left, and Melissa Garcia Rodriguez say they have experienced racial tension in some of their classes, despite feeling generally welcomed by most students and faculty. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen attends the 2017 Agriculture Fair on Tuesday in Paris. Christophe Ena/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Christophe Ena/AP

In A Heated Campaign Season, French Politicians Flock To Paris Farm Fair

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517882201/517882202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville, Ill. A thriving American Indian city that rose to prominence after A.D. 900 owing to successful maize farming, it may have collapsed because of changing climate. Michael Dolan/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Dolan/Flickr

Urban Seed plans to grow 25 different crops, from bell peppers to beets to alpine strawberries, in high-tech greenhouses smack in the middle of Las Vegas. Courtesy of Urban Seed hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Urban Seed

Yadkin Valley Farm in Yadkin County, N.C., has been in Chuck Wooten Jr.'s family for at least five generations. Ari Shaprio/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ari Shaprio/NPR

In Rural N.C., Trump Supporters Eagerly Await A Different Kind Of Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/510301308/510301309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Natalie Arroyo is a senior "Aggie," one of 600 New York City public school students enrolled in a specialized, four-year agriculture program at John Bowne High School in Queens. She plans to become an agriculture educator after college. Lela Nargi for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lela Nargi for NPR
Dan Charles/NPR

By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505729436/507670099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beverly Kurtz and Tim Guenthner live near Gross Reservoir outside Boulder, Colo. They oppose a an expansion project that would raise the reservoir's dam by 131 feet. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

High Demand, Low Supply: Colorado River Water Crisis Hits Across The West

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507569514/507597725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Land in the Red River Valley of Minnesota and North Dakota, as in much of the country, is dominated by farming. Richard Hamilton Smith/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Hamilton Smith/Getty Images

Second-grader Kadija Noor's family came to the U.S. from Somalia. She says being a part of Growing Colorado Kids has led her to eat more healthful foods, although she still prefers the garden's strawberries to its vegetables. Megan Verlee/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Megan Verlee/Colorado Public Radio

Bruce Hincks of Meadowood Farm walks through his patch of brussels sprouts in Yarmouth, Maine. Hincks, who has been farming for 40 years, said that this is the worst season, in terms of drought and heat, that he has seen in 10 or 12 years. Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images