farming farming

Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Farmer Kevin Sullivan put solar panels on a portion of his property in Suffield, Conn. Patrick Skahill/WNPR hide caption

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Patrick Skahill/WNPR

For New England Farmers Looking To Make Ends Meet, The Sun Provides A Harvest

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Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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Children walk through a rice field outside the town of Kelilalina in eastern Madagascar. Rice is the dominant food and the dominant crop on the Indian Ocean island, but changing weather patterns are disrupting production in some parts of the country. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Erratic Weather Threatens Livelihood Of Rice Farmers In Madagascar

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A farmer checks on produce at Padao Farms, a 15-acre plot run by the Yang family in Fresno, Calif., that specializes in Asian greens. Courtesy of Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement hide caption

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Courtesy of Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement

The theft of agricultural trade secrets is a growing problem, according to the FBI. University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr hide caption

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University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr

Buried machinery in barn lot in Dallas, S.D., during the Dust Bowl in 1936. United States Department of Agriculture/Wikipedia hide caption

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United States Department of Agriculture/Wikipedia

U.S. Pays Farmers Billions To Save The Soil. But It's Blowing Away

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A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Carmen Black (left) took over a farm in Iowa last year. Don Bustos has been farming in New Mexico for decades. Maja Black/Courtesy of Carmen Black; Courtesy of Don Bustos hide caption

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Maja Black/Courtesy of Carmen Black; Courtesy of Don Bustos

What To Expect When You're Expecting To Own A Farm

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The avocados on the right are Hass, America's favorite variety of the green fruit. At left are GEM avocados, the great-granddaughter of the Hass. GEM avocados grow well in California's Central Valley and, in taste tests, they scored better than the Hass in terms of eating quality. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

What remains of the home of O.T. Jackson, the founder of Dearfield, Colo., sits on the town site in rural Weld County. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Farmers are lobbying for the ability to buy software to fix their equipment, and some are hacking their way around the problem. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Farmers Look For Ways To Circumvent Tractor Software Locks

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Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences students Liz Hada, left, and Melissa Garcia Rodriguez say they have experienced racial tension in some of their classes, despite feeling generally welcomed by most students and faculty. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media