Allen Peterson's farm, near the city of Turlock, Calif., lies next to a concrete-lined canal full of water. He's one of the lucky ones. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

California Farmers Ask: Hey Buddy, Can You Spare Some Water?

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Workers sort through key limes at a packaging house in Apatzingan, Michoacan. More than 90 percent of limes imported into the U.S. come from Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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With Cartels On The Run, Mexican Lime Farmers Keep More Of The Green

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North Dakota farmer Jim Reimers shows off one of the drones he uses to collect data on his family's 30,000-acre farm. Steve Henn/NPR hide caption

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High-Ho, The Derry-O, The Farmer And The Drone

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Miller with one of his cows. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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For Many, Farming Is A Labor Of Love, Not A Living

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Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of 14 different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

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Dairy cows feed through a fence at an Idaho farm, in this 2009 file photo. Idaho's Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter enacted a bill Friday that criminalizes the act of secretly filming animal abuse at farms. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Benny Bunting, a farm advocate for Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA, in front of one of his old chicken houses in Oak City, N.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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The System Supplying America's Chickens Pits Farmer Vs. Farmer

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Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

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Economists say small-business owners — especially farmers dealing in high volume and low profit margins — are more likely to accept a volatile currency like Bitcoin than bigger businesses. Allen Sheffield/Flickr hide caption

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Allen Sheffield/Flickr