Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey sample water in Goodwater Creek, Mo., for pesticides and other chemicals that may have run off from the surrounding land. Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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What Is Farm Runoff Doing To The Water? Scientists Wade In

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Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

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Prehistoric "pantries": This illustration is based on archaeological findings in Jordan of structures built to store extra grain some 11,000-12,000 years ago. Illustration by E. Carlson/Courtesy of Dr. Ian Kuijt/University of Notre Dame hide caption

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Left to their own devices, many seedless grapes would be puny and soft. But these Thompson seedless got pleasingly plump after a little girdling and hormone treatment. Daniel M.N. Turner/NPR hide caption

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Valley Malt, in Hadley, Mass., works with 25 farmers growing six different types of grain in the Northeast. Courtesy of Valley Malt hide caption

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Vernon Hugh Bowman lives outside the small town of Sandborn, Ind. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Farmer's Fight With Monsanto Reaches The Supreme Court

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That's a valuable commodity: A hay bale at a farm in Eatonton, Ga., earlier this year. Erik S. Lesser /EPA /Landov hide caption

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Crime On The Farm: Hay Thefts Soar As Drought Deepens

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Mah Bow Tan, a member of Singapore's Parliament, inspects Chinese cabbage growing at the commercial vertical farm. Troughs of the veggies stack up to 30 feet in the greenhouse. Courtesy of MNDsingapore. hide caption

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After a leg injury didn't heal well earlier this year, Lou has difficulty walking. He and his partner, Bill, will be slaughtered at the end of the month, and their meat will be used to feed students at Green Mountain College in Vermont. Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Despite Protest, College Plans To Slaughter, Serve Farm's Beloved Oxen

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New Moo-Bile App Helps Keep Cows Cool And Farmers Updated

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Brent Ware, a member of the robotics team at Kansas State, stands next to a planting robot that won a national competition. Jeremy Bernfeld/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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