Josephine Rudolph, 99, says she couldn't afford to live at the Joyce Eisenberg Keefer Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Reseda, Calif., without Medi-Cal assistance. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Paul Hornback was a senior engineer and analyst for the U.S. Army when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago at age 55. His wife, Sarah, had to retire 18 months ago to care for him full time. Courtesy of the Hornbeck family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Hornbeck family

Big Financial Costs Are Part Of Alzheimer's Toll On Families

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Minnesota, Washington and Oregon topped the ranking, which looked at 26 variables, including affordability and whether patients could get good paid care at home. Alabama and Kentucky came in last. Fred Froese/iStockphoto hide caption

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Fred Froese/iStockphoto

How Your State Rates In Terms Of Long-Term Care

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The first lesson of long-term care insurance: Shopping before health problems set in improves your chances of being accepted while tempering lifetime premium payments. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

How To Shop For Long-Term Care Insurance

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The health services offered in 30 years may not be explicitly covered by the long-term care insurance you buy today. Pamela Moore/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Pamela Moore/iStockphoto.com