AquaBounty's salmon (rear) have been genetically modified to grow to market size in about half the time as a normal salmon — 16 to 18 months, rather than three years. MCT /Landov hide caption

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Genetically Modified Salmon Is Safe To Eat, FDA Says

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Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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AquaBounty's salmon (background) has been genetically modified to grow bigger and faster than a conventional Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground.) Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. hide caption

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Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

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A woman shops at a supermarket in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Allen Williams grows corn and soybeans for Clarkson Grain, which has been selling GMO-free grain to Japan for years. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

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After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate. iStockphoto hide caption

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Soon after being sliced, a conventional Granny Smith apple (left) starts to brown, while a newly developed GM Granny Smith stays fresher looking. Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. hide caption

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This GMO Apple Won't Brown. Will That Sour The Fruit's Image?

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Labels on bags of snack foods indicate they are non-GMO food products. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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So What Happens If The Movement To Label GMOs Succeeds?

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Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

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A cornfield is shrouded in mist at sunrise in rural Springfield, Neb. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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American Farmers Say They Feed The World, But Do They?

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An Argentine farmer stands by his field of trangenic soy, designed for resistance to drought and salinity. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

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Russ Kremer with some of his hogs on his farm in Frankenstein, Mo., in 2009. Instead of buying conventional feed, Kremer grazes his hogs in a pasture, and grows grains and legumes for them. Jeff Roberson /AP hide caption

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Farmers harvest a sugar beet crop in Gilcrest, Colo. Matthew Staver/Landov hide caption

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Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

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In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

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A farmer holds Monsanto's Roundup Ready soybean seeds at his family farm in Bunceton, Mo. Dan Gill/AP hide caption

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