Worker Javier Alcantar tends to crops at the Monsanto Co. test field in Woodland, Calif., in 2012. Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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GMOs Are Safe, But Don't Always Deliver On Promises, Top Scientists Say

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Boxes of white button mushrooms. Scientists have used a popular gene editing tool called CRISPR/Cas9 to snip out a tiny piece of DNA from one particular gene in a white button mushroom. The resulting mushroom doesn't brown when cut. Adam Fagen/Flickr hide caption

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Will Genetically 'Edited' Food Be Regulated? The Case Of The Mushroom

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AquaBounty's salmon (rear) have been genetically modified to grow to market size in about half the time as a normal salmon — 16 to 18 months, rather than three years. MCT /Landov hide caption

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Genetically Modified Salmon Is Safe To Eat, FDA Says

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Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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AquaBounty's salmon (background) has been genetically modified to grow bigger and faster than a conventional Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground.) Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. hide caption

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Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

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A woman shops at a supermarket in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Allen Williams grows corn and soybeans for Clarkson Grain, which has been selling GMO-free grain to Japan for years. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

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After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate. iStockphoto hide caption

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Soon after being sliced, a conventional Granny Smith apple (left) starts to brown, while a newly developed GM Granny Smith stays fresher looking. Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. hide caption

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This GMO Apple Won't Brown. Will That Sour The Fruit's Image?

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Labels on bags of snack foods indicate they are non-GMO food products. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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So What Happens If The Movement To Label GMOs Succeeds?

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