Rodney Stotts walks across the roof of the Matthew Henson Earth Conservation Center with one of his hawks. A former drug dealer, he is now a falconer — one of only 30 African-American falconers in the U.S., he says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Washington, D.C., A Program In Which Birds And People Lift Each Other Up

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Google wants to pump 1.5 million gallons of water per day to cool servers at its data center in Berkeley County, S.C. "It's great to have Google in this region," conservationist Emily Cedzo said. "So by no means are we going after Google ... Our concern, primarily, is the source of that water." Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Google Moves In And Wants To Pump 1.5 Million Gallons Of Water Per Day

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Sudan, the last known male of the northern white rhinoceros subspecies, stands for his close-up in a paddock last year at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. If Tinder users swipe right on Sudan's profile, they're taken to a page asking for contributions to help him reproduce. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

Steve Reed uses OhmConnect, a service that pays customers to lower their energy use at home during periods of high demand. Megan Wood/inewsource hide caption

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Megan Wood/inewsource

Energy Savings Can Be Fun, But No Need To Turn Off All The Lights

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A diver swims in a kelp forest in California's Channel Island National Park, where several of the state's marine protected areas are located. National Park Service hide caption

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National Park Service

In California's Protected Waters, Counting Fish Without Getting Wet

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In a speech on Monday, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe said his compatriots failed to protect Cecil the lion. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

Zimbabwe's President Blames 'Vandals' For Killing Cecil The Lion

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One Of The Nation's Biggest Urban Forests Isn't Where You'd Expect

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Cecil the lion is shown walking in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park in a YouTube video from July 9, 2015. Credit: Bryan Orford Bryan Orford/YouTube hide caption

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Bryan Orford/YouTube

Investigation Underway Into Killing Of Cecil, Zimbabwe's Best Known Lion

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M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States. Matt Ozug/NPR hide caption

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Matt Ozug/NPR

Gambler-Turned-Conservationist Devotes Fortune To Florida Nature Preserve

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Hudson River view. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

Landmark Conservation Deal Offers A First Glimpse Of New Wilderness

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A tray of sardines in Costa Mesa, California, in this November 17, 2014 photo. Plummeting sardine populations force a complete ban on sardine fishing off the U.S. West Coast for more than a year. LUCY NICHOLSON/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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LUCY NICHOLSON/Reuters /Landov