Ivan Day shapes his mince pies using traditional patterns from hundreds of years ago. Rich Preston hide caption

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John Schulz/John Schulz Photography

Members of the women's suffrage movement prepare to march on New York's Wall Street in 1913, armed with leaflets and slogans demanding the vote for women. Paul Thompson/Getty Images hide caption

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From a scapegoat for the "sapping" of the "white race," to a symbol of modern engineering, to a target of the counterculture movement: White bread's been a social lightning rod time and again. iStockphoto hide caption

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Evelyn Birkby interviews guests on her KMA radio program, Down a Country Lane, in 1951 in Shenandoah, Iowa. Courtesy of University of Iowa Women's Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

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"Asparagus Shortcake," a leftover creation from The Cook's Book published in 1908. Special Collections/Michigan State University Libraries hide caption

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A view of Canton (Guangzhou), on the Pearl River in China, circa 1840. Canton was already a great trading port when the American ship Empress of China arrived in 1784 to fill up its hold with tea. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Originating in Mexico City, suadero tacos have gone from a food of the poor to a widely adored filling. These tacos are made from a variety of meats, including suadero, a cut from the lower parts of a cow. The meat is cooked in a griddle-like device called a comal. Paulo Vidales/Courtesy of Phaidon hide caption

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Make mine a venti: An example of a drinking vessel from the Grasshopper Pueblo archaeological site in central Arizona. Researchers tested shards of similar vessels found at various sites in the American Southwest and found evidence that people in the region were drinking caffeinated cacao and yaupon holly drinks 1,000 years back. Courtesy Patricia Crown hide caption

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This dish — mussels smoked in pine needles and pine ash butter — was inspired by a 1605 recipe that the explorer Samuel de Champlain made for his men while traveling through Canada. It's one of many historically inspired items on the menu at the Toronto restaurant Boralia. Courtesy of Nick Merzetti hide caption

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An illustration from The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, published in 1897. Between the 1860s and 1920, when Prohibition went into effect, American bartending came into its own. Internet Archive Book Images/Flickr hide caption

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Lee Perry-Gal measures chicken long bones at the zooarchaeology lab, Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa. Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz hide caption

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Waiter carriers pass food to passengers on a train stopping in Gordonsville, Va., in this undated photo. After the Civil War, local African-American women found a route to financial freedom by selling their famous fried chicken and other home-made goods track-side. Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville hide caption

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Before distilleries used glass bottles, many of them offered liquor stores branded ceramic jugs that could be filled and sold to customers. This pair of George Dickel jugs was used around 1900. From The Art of American Whiskey by Noah Rothbaum. Courtesy of Ten Speed Press/Diageo hide caption

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Art of the people: Fill a glass with hope, a butter sculpture crafted by Jim Victor and Marie Pelton. "People don't understand how [the sculpting] is done --€” it's like magic and just appears," Victor says. "But people understand butter." Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton hide caption

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Planning for battle? Napoleon's your man. Planning for breakfast? Not so much. Napoleon Crossing the Saint-Bernard Pass, 20 May 1800/Musee de l'Histoire de France/Corbis hide caption

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American GIs line up in the street in Troina, Sicily, utensils and dishes in hand, as they wait for a meal from a large pot, July 1943. Oregano grows abundantly in Southern Italy, where many GIs encountered the herb for the first time, and fell in love. Many brought the craving back home with them after the war. U.S. Army/Getty Images hide caption

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