Lee Perry-Gal measures chicken long bones at the zooarchaeology lab, Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa. Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz

Waiter carriers pass food to passengers on a train stopping in Gordonsville, Va., in this undated photo. After the Civil War, local African-American women found a route to financial freedom by selling their famous fried chicken and other home-made goods track-side. Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Town of Gordonsville

Before distilleries used glass bottles, many of them offered liquor stores branded ceramic jugs that could be filled and sold to customers. This pair of George Dickel jugs was used around 1900. From The Art of American Whiskey by Noah Rothbaum. Courtesy of Ten Speed Press/Diageo hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Ten Speed Press/Diageo

Art of the people: Fill a glass with hope, a butter sculpture crafted by Jim Victor and Marie Pelton. "People don't understand how [the sculpting] is done --€” it's like magic and just appears," Victor says. "But people understand butter." Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton

Planning for battle? Napoleon's your man. Planning for breakfast? Not so much. Napoleon Crossing the Saint-Bernard Pass, 20 May 1800/Musee de l'Histoire de France/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Napoleon Crossing the Saint-Bernard Pass, 20 May 1800/Musee de l'Histoire de France/Corbis

American GIs line up in the street in Troina, Sicily, utensils and dishes in hand, as they wait for a meal from a large pot, July 1943. Oregano grows abundantly in Southern Italy, where many GIs encountered the herb for the first time, and fell in love. Many brought the craving back home with them after the war. U.S. Army/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. Army/Getty Images

The right to dine out alone in public during the day was an early victory in the women's rights movement. And as brunch took off in post-war America, for some, it became an exercise in women's lib. Chaloner Woods/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chaloner Woods/Getty Images

A Hindu servant serves tea to a European colonial woman in the early 20th century. The British habit of adding tea to sugar wasn't merely a matter of taste: It also helped steer the course of history. Underwood & Underwood/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Underwood & Underwood/Corbis

A 16th century woodcut shows the interior of a kitchen. In medieval Europe, cooks combined contrasting flavors and spices in much the same way that Indian cooking still does today. Paul Lacroix/Wikimedia hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Lacroix/Wikimedia

An illustration from a book published in 1851 depicts the cultivation of tea in China. In the mid-19th century, China controlled the world's tea production. That soon changed, thanks to a botanist with a penchant for espionage. Internet Archive hide caption

itoggle caption Internet Archive

An illustration depicts Jesus Christ transforming water into wine during the wedding at Cana (John 2:7). Joseph Martin Kronheim/Kean Collection/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Martin Kronheim/Kean Collection/Getty Images

The rellenong manok at La Cocina de Tita Moning, a restaurant in Manila. Chef Suzette Montinola uses a traditional recipe from the 1930s that belonged to her grandmother. Aurora Almendral for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Aurora Almendral for NPR

Just imagine if this 19th-century turkey was stuffed with warbler, lark, bunting, thrush, quail, lapwing, plover, partridge, woodcock, teal, guinea fowl, duck, chicken, pheasant, goose, turkey and bustard (an Old World breed of turkey). Philip Spruyt/Stapleton Collection/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Philip Spruyt/Stapleton Collection/Corbis

Britain's King George II: Snazzy dresser, adventurous eater. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Morrie Fisher drinks at Mawson Station, an Australian base in East Antarctica, in 1957. Apparently, these sorts of amusements tend to pop up when you're bored in a barren landscape. Courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division

Say aaaaaah! Dental caries and other signs of oral disease are plain to see in the upper teeth of this hunter-gatherer, between 14,000 and 15,000 years old. The findings challenge the idea that the original paleo diet was inherently healthy, says paleo-anthropologist Louise Humphrey. It all depended, she says, on what wild foods were available. Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote