Michael Twitty wants credit given to the enslaved African-Americans who were part of Southern cuisine's creation. Here he is in period costume at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's Virginia estate. Erika Beras for NPR hide caption

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Erika Beras for NPR

This Historian Wants You To Know The Real Story Of Southern Food

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Workers unload bananas in New Orleans. Bananas Foster, one of New Orleans' favorite desserts, is a lasting legacy of an oft-forgotten chapter in the city's history: the banana trade, which spawned banana republics. Arnold Genthe/Library of Congress hide caption

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Arnold Genthe/Library of Congress

"You can't have the modern American restaurant without Delmonico's," explains Yale historian Paul Freedman. The restaurant opened in 1837, setting the bar very high for fine dining. Above, a dinner in honor of an admiral held at Delmonico's in 1906. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

Food For Thought: 10 Restaurants That Shaped America

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Tour guide Ron Craig points to a photo in Jack Daniel's old office at the whiskey maker's distillery in Lynchburg, Tenn. The photo, taken in the 1890s, shows Jack Daniel (wearing a black-banded white hat and a gray goatee), seated next to an African-American man. He and a second African-American man (top left) are believed to be sons of Nearis Green, who may have helped teach Daniel his trade. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

Jack Daniel's Heralds A Slave's Role In Its Origin Story

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Oil down, Grenada's national dish, is a melting pot of its cultural history. This hearty stew is made of local veggies, salted meat and aromatic spices. It's a dish prepared cookout-style at social gatherings, where everyone brings something to put into the pot. Scott Neuman for NPR hide caption

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Scott Neuman for NPR

The coffee cabinet is a Rhode Island staple. It's an ice cream beverage dating back to the World War II era. The ingredient list is pretty simple: It's just coffee syrup, ice cream and milk. John Bender/Rhode Island Public Radio hide caption

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John Bender/Rhode Island Public Radio

What's In That Coffee Cabinet? A Delicious Taste Of Rhode Island History

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A colorful selection of gelato flavors for sale at a shop in Florence, Italy. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

Hot Enough For You? Cool Off With A Brief History Of Frozen Treats

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Rich Harlan prepares Coney hot dogs at his restaurant, Red Hots Coney Island, in Detroit. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Coney: The Hot Dog That Fueled Detroit's Middle-Class Dreams

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For decades, Nitza Villapol hosted Cocina al Minuto, a popular cooking show in Cuba. In the decades after Fidel Castro took power, she adapted her cooking, teaching Cubans how to make do without certain ingredients while instructing them in how to use once-eschewed produce and cuts of meat in new ways. Screenshot from YouTube hide caption

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Screenshot from YouTube

The 'Turkey' apricot, a hand-colored engraving after a drawing by Augusta Innes Withers (1792-1869), from the first volume of John Lindley's Pomological Magazine (1827-1828). The Romans dubbed the apricot the "precious one." Poets praised its beauty. The conquering Arabs took it to the Mideast, where the luxurious fruit was exploited in sugary confections. The Royal Horticultural Society Diary/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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The Royal Horticultural Society Diary/Wikimedia Commons

Why did humans start cultivating celery? It's low-calorie and, one might argue, low flavor. We asked some experts at the intersection of botany and anthropology to share their best guesses. Cora Niele/Getty Images hide caption

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Cora Niele/Getty Images

Chinese and other Asian beer brands on display at a supermarket. An ancient brewery discovered in China's Central Plain shows the Chinese were making barley beer with fairly advanced techniques some 5,000 years ago. Chris/Flickr hide caption

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Chris/Flickr