Britain's King George II: Snazzy dresser, adventurous eater. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Morrie Fisher drinks at Mawson Station, an Australian base in East Antarctica, in 1957. Apparently, these sorts of amusements tend to pop up when you're bored in a barren landscape. Courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division

Say aaaaaah! Dental caries and other signs of oral disease are plain to see in the upper teeth of this hunter-gatherer, between 14,000 and 15,000 years old. The findings challenge the idea that the original paleo diet was inherently healthy, says paleo-anthropologist Louise Humphrey. It all depended, she says, on what wild foods were available. Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote

Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C. Eric H. Cline/Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University hide caption

itoggle caption Eric H. Cline/Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University

A marriage made in New York, though both partners came with plenty of baggage. Jerry Deutsch/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption Jerry Deutsch/iStockphoto.com

Would he have won a James Beard? The First Earl of Sandwich probably brought the iced chocolate drink to England from Spain, decades before the recipe appeared in cookbooks. Jan Arkesteijn/Wikimedia.org hide caption

itoggle caption Jan Arkesteijn/Wikimedia.org

Even in Sandro Botticelli's painting The Birth of Venus, the goddess's belly resembles a plump, firm tortellino. Wikimedia.org hide caption

itoggle caption Wikimedia.org

The heirloom corn variety has only eight rows of kernels and hence, its name: New England Eight Row Flint. Courtesy of Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture

Prehistoric Deer Stew? A fragment of pottery found in Neustadt, Germany, is coated in the microscopic remains of crushed mustard seeds and roasted fish and ruminant meat, possibly deer. This shard dates back to about 5,900 years ago. Courtesy of University of York, BioArch hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of University of York, BioArch

Captain Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, is said to have tucked slow-burning fuses into his beard and lit them on fire before plundering towns for gold and rum. Hulton Archive Circa/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hulton Archive Circa/Getty Images

How did the food taste? These faces say it all. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, Meade in Virginia, August-November 1863. Timothy H. O'Sullivan/Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Timothy H. O'Sullivan/Library of Congress

Ole Smoky's bottles are designed in keeping with the local eastern Tennessee tradition to "pass the jar." Moonshine was typically drunk out of old Mason jars. Van Gallik/Courtesy of Ole Smoky hide caption

itoggle caption Van Gallik/Courtesy of Ole Smoky