The Birth of Venus, by Sandro Botticelli, depicts the goddess of love floating on a giant scallop shell. The word aphrodisiac derives from her Greek name, Aphrodite. Sandro Botticelli/Wikimedia hide caption

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Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

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The Drakes Bay Oyster Farm caters to local residents and restaurants. But unless its lease is renewed, its days are numbered. Richard Gonzales/NPR hide caption

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Fight Over Calif. Oyster Company Splits Chefs And Land Defenders

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Lunch with oysters and wine by Frans van Mieris, 1635-1681. Universal Images Group/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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For The Love Of Oysters: How A Kiss From The Sea Evokes Passion

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A plate of Sweet Jesus oysters grown in Chesapeake Bay by Hollywood Oyster Co. in Hollywood, Md. Katy Adams/Courtesy Clyde's Restaurant Group hide caption

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Young oysters live on old oyster shells and slowly mature while forming a complete shell. Astrid Riecken/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Can Oysters With No Sex Life Repopulate The Chesapeake Bay?

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Scientists blame higher levels of carbon dioxide in Pacific Ocean waters caused by global warming for the failure of oyster seeds to thrive in hatcheries. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Serve this for T-Day, and you'll be in sync with history. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Oyster Ice Cream: A Thanksgiving Tradition Mark Twain Could Get Behind

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