In a post on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote that the live-streamed images following a police shooting in Minnesota were "graphic and heartbreaking." Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Wake Of Shootings, Facebook Struggles To Define Hate Speech

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Here she is, in full Chewbacca glory, laughing to the point of full-on weeping. Facebook hide caption

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Meet Your New Wookiee Queen Of Viral Video: 'Chewbacca Mom'

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Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook hide caption

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A Facebook official said the company has found no evidence to back up allegations that company contractors suppressed stories of interest to conservatives in its trending topics section. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about the company's 10-year road map during his keynote address Tuesday at the F8 Facebook Developer Conference in San Francisco. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Facebook's New Master Plan: Kill Other Apps

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When You Become The Person You Hate On The Internet

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Care For A Career Change-Up? These Stories Are Proof It's Never Too Late

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From the Apple and FBI dispute in the U.S. to a legal case in Brazil involving the WhatsApp messaging service, U.S. tech companies are finding themselves subject to widely varying laws for cooperating with local police. William Volcov/Brazil Photo Press/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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For U.S. Tech Firms Abroad And Data In The Cloud, Whose Laws Apply?

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Julie Zhuo, product design director at Facebook, demonstrates the new emoji-like stickers users can press in addition to the like button. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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When You Want To Express Empathy, Skip The Emoji

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Facebook board member Marc Andreessen, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist who uses Twitter prolifically, has apologized for tweets suggesting he supported colonialism. Kimberly White/Getty hide caption

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Colonialism Comment Puts Facebook Under Scrutiny

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Members of Indian Youth Congress — a wing of the National Congress party — and National Students Union of India protest for Internet freedom in April 2015 in New Delhi. Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Should India's Internet Be Free Of Charge, Or Free Of Control?

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How To Get Dads To Take Parental Leave? Seeing Other Dads Do It

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