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Twitter officials are expected to meet with Senate Intelligence Committee investigators. Staffers want to know about the use of fake accounts, bots and trolls to influence the trends and topics on the social platform. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

For months, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had claimed that security experts at Facebook had found no evidence of Russians involved in fake news. Now, Facebook is turning over thousands of ads to Congress it said had been placed by a Russian agency. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

William Evanina, the head of U.S. counterintelligence. Office of the Director of National Intelligence hide caption

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Office of the Director of National Intelligence

The Man Who Protects America's Secrets

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai talks about the new Google Assistant during a 2016 product event in San Francisco. The voice assistant is one of a number of Google products that will provide user data to the curation service that the company is launching Wednesday. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

With Entry Into Interest Curation, Google Goes Head-To-Head With Facebook

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Evaldas Rimasauskas walks into court in May in Vilnius, Lithuania. On Monday, the court ruled that Rimasauskas, allegedly behind a massive email scheme, must be extradited to the U.S. to stand trial. Mindaugas Kulbis/AP hide caption

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Mindaugas Kulbis/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (right) speaks with panelists at the Facebook Communities Summit on Thursday in Chicago, where he announced Facebook's mission will change to focus on the activity level of its users. From left are Lola Omolola, Erin Schatteman and Janet Sanchez, who run popular Facebook groups. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

Facebook has created new tools for trying to keep terrorist content off the site. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How Facebook Uses Technology To Block Terrorist-Related Content

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Eli Pariser, CEO of Upworthy, speaks onstage at during the 2014 SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. At its peak, the site, which is founded on a mission of promoting viral and uplifting content, was reaching close to 90 million people a month. Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW

Upworthy Was One Of The Hottest Sites Ever. You Won't Believe What Happened Next

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Pakistani religious students and activists gathered for a protest in Islamabad in March, as they demanded the removal of all blasphemous content from social media sites in the country. Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images

An Austrian court ruled on Friday that the "hate postings" against an Austrian politician must be deleted from Facebook worldwide. The case concerns posts insulting Eva Glawischnig, the leader of the Austrian Green party. Above, a poster featuring Glawischnig before legislative elections in September 2013. Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images