A new book examines how federal government policies made it easier for minorities to open fast-food franchises than grocery stores. Today the landscape of urban America reflects this history. Chris Kindred for NPR hide caption

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Chris Kindred for NPR

Everytable opened its first location, in South Los Angeles, on July 30. Courtesy of Everytable hide caption

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Courtesy of Everytable

One Restaurant's Recipe For Social Good: Same Meals, Different Prices

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Inside a Brown's Super Store. Brown's operates seven profitable supermarkets in low-income neighborhoods in Philadelphia. Courtesy of Brown's Super Stores, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Brown's Super Stores, Inc.

Wendell Pierce, the actor and co-owner of Sterling Farms grocery store, chats with Dwight Henry, who will be making doughnuts and buttermilk drops in the store. David Grunfeld/The Times-Picayune /Landov hide caption

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David Grunfeld/The Times-Picayune /Landov

As a new documentary shows, a plate of soul food is loaded with questions about history, identity and health. Laylah Amatullah Barrayn/PBS hide caption

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Laylah Amatullah Barrayn/PBS

The Cost Of Being A Nation Of 'Soul Food Junkies'

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Five days a week, the Peaches & Greens truck sells affordable fruits and vegetables to families on public assistance, people without a car, homebound seniors and even local workers who otherwise would grab fast food or candy for a snack. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Symbols like these are designed to help shoppers make healthier choices Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

What Will Make The Food Desert Bloom?

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Participants, including Mario Batali, right, at the "Eat In," a Food Day lunch event in Times Square in New York on Monday.

Philip Greenberg/Philip Greenberg for Food Day hide caption

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Philip Greenberg/Philip Greenberg for Food Day