Donald Trump has nominated Jay Clayton, a Wall Street lawyer, to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Critics say it's another example of Trump packing his Cabinet with Wall Street insiders. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Can An SEC Nominee With Ties To Goldman Regulate Wall Street Impartially?

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In the ongoing scandal engulfing Wells Fargo, the bank says it fired wrongdoers. But some workers say they were trying to blow the whistle and Wells Fargo fired them. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Workers Say Wells Fargo Unfairly Scarred Their Careers

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Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is sworn in on Capitol Hill, where he is testifying before the House Financial Services Committee about Wells Fargo's opening of unauthorized customer accounts. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

State Treasurer John Chiang (right) at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., in May. On Wednesday, Chiang announced he is suspending major parts of the state's business relationship with Wells Fargo because of a scandal involving unauthorized customer accounts. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A man walks past a Wells Fargo branch in Philadelphia. The banking company says it wants to make good by its customers, but figuring out how to do that will be a tall task. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Wells Fargo's Unauthorized Accounts Likely Hurt Customers' Credit Scores

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, about the unauthorized opening of customer accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking Committee hearing Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at the National Press Club Wednesday. Warren was critical of President Obama's plan to change how U.S. multinational companies are taxed. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Obama signs the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul bill in Washington on July 21, 2010. Five years later, debate over the effectiveness of the legislation continues. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

5 Years Later, Legacy Of Financial Overhaul Still Being Weighed

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The Bank of England in London in a photograph taken in March. The central bank inadvertently revealed that it was planning for a possible withdrawal of the U.K. from the European Union. Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters/Landov

President Obama announces changes to U.S. policy on Cuba, including relaxing restrictions on U.S. banking in the country, in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov

Opportunity, Caution Seen For U.S. Banks As Cuba Rules Ease

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NPR's Ari Shapiro, who recently moved to London and set up a bank account, reports that it can still be an expensive and time consuming process to transfer money internationally. Here, people pass by a branch of Lloyds Bank in London, on Sept. 17. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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Sang Tan/AP