Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at the National Press Club Wednesday. Warren was critical of President Obama's plan to change how U.S. multinational companies are taxed. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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President Obama signs the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul bill in Washington on July 21, 2010. Five years later, debate over the effectiveness of the legislation continues. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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5 Years Later, Legacy Of Financial Overhaul Still Being Weighed

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The Bank of England in London in a photograph taken in March. The central bank inadvertently revealed that it was planning for a possible withdrawal of the U.K. from the European Union. Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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President Obama announces changes to U.S. policy on Cuba, including relaxing restrictions on U.S. banking in the country, in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Opportunity, Caution Seen For U.S. Banks As Cuba Rules Ease

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NPR's Ari Shapiro, who recently moved to London and set up a bank account, reports that it can still be an expensive and time consuming process to transfer money internationally. Here, people pass by a branch of Lloyds Bank in London, on Sept. 17. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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JPMorgan Chase will reportedly pay a $700 million fine to settle allegations that it made risky trades out of its London office that led to more than $6 billion in losses. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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JPMorgan To Get Whale Of A Fine For Trading Losses

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The $1.9 billion settlement from British banking firm HSBC will settle allegations of allowing money laundering and transfers of billions from Iran. Timur Emek/Getty Images hide caption

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