Three-time Masters winner Phil Mickelson, shown at the Honda Classic golf tournament last year, benefited from insider trading of Dean Foods stock, according to U.S. officials. He has not been charged. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

toggle caption Luis M. Alvarez/AP

Golfer Phil Mickelson Is Named In Insider Trading Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478682511/478729157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Authorities say several publicly traded companies, including Clorox, Caterpillar and Viacom, had press releases stolen and used to implement an insider-trading scheme. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

BP Mobile Incident Commander Keith Seilhan talks with oil cleanup workers in Gulf Shores, Ala., in July 2010. Seilhan has settled with SEC regulators who say he avoided $100,000 in stock and options losses by trading on inside information related to the spill. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption Dave Martin/AP

Preet Bharara, United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York speaks at a news conference July 25, 2013 about a federal indictment against SAC Capital. Timothy Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Timothy Clary/AFP/Getty Images