Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

The HPV vaccine has reduced the prevalence of the cancer-causing human papillomavirus by as much as 65 percent among those who are vaccinated. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Advice For Doctors Talking To Parents About HPV Vaccine: Make It Brief

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WFYI's Jake Harper reports health stories for Side Effects Public Media in Indianapolis. His newest health anxiety stems from the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Brian Paul/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Brian Paul/Side Effects Public Media

Is 20-Something Too Late For A Guy To Get The HPV Vaccine?

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. The vaccine is recommended for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls. Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images

HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer and other cancers by fending off the virus that causes them. But it's been a tough sell with doctors and parents. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Convenience may be one reason why most teens haven't gotten all three HPV shots. VCU CNS/Flickr hide caption

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VCU CNS/Flickr

Parents And Teens Aren't Up To Speed On HPV Risks, Doctors Say

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University of Miami pediatrician Judith Schaechter gives a girl an HPV vaccination in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination at the University of Miami in 2011. The vaccine protects against the human papillomavirus, which can cause cervical cancer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vaccines against the HPV virus are already used to prevent cervical and anal cancer. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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Harry Cabluck/AP

A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination from Judith Schaechter, a pediatrician at the University of Miami, in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vaccine Against HPV Has Cut Infections In Teenage Girls

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