The HPV vaccine has reduced the prevalence of the cancer-causing human papillomavirus by as much as 65 percent among those who are vaccinated. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Advice For Doctors Talking To Parents About HPV Vaccine: Make It Brief

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504136418/504395615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WFYI's Jake Harper reports health stories for Side Effects Public Media in Indianapolis. His newest health anxiety stems from the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Brian Paul/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Paul/Side Effects Public Media

Is 20-Something Too Late For A Guy To Get The HPV Vaccine?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497677367/498219569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. The vaccine is recommended for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls. Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images

HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer and other cancers by fending off the virus that causes them. But it's been a tough sell with doctors and parents. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Convenience may be one reason why most teens haven't gotten all three HPV shots. VCU CNS/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
VCU CNS/Flickr

Parents And Teens Aren't Up To Speed On HPV Risks, Doctors Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/279609708/279709523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

University of Miami pediatrician Judith Schaechter gives a girl an HPV vaccination in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination at the University of Miami in 2011. The vaccine protects against the human papillomavirus, which can cause cervical cancer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vaccines against the HPV virus are already used to prevent cervical and anal cancer. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Harry Cabluck/AP

A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination from Judith Schaechter, a pediatrician at the University of Miami, in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vaccine Against HPV Has Cut Infections In Teenage Girls

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/193478716/193584789" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript