HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer and other cancers by fending off the virus that causes them. But it's been a tough sell with doctors and parents. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Convenience may be one reason why most teens haven't gotten all three HPV shots. VCU CNS/Flickr hide caption

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University of Miami pediatrician Judith Schaechter gives a girl an HPV vaccination in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination at the University of Miami in 2011. The vaccine protects against the human papillomavirus, which can cause cervical cancer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Vaccines against the HPV virus are already used to prevent cervical and anal cancer. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination from Judith Schaechter, a pediatrician at the University of Miami, in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauren Fant winces as she receives her third and final shot of HPV vaccine from nurse Stephanie Pearson in Marietta, Ga., in 2007. John Amis/AP hide caption

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An 18-year-old girl winces as she has her third and final shot of the HPV vaccine. John Amis/AP hide caption

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Connor Perruccello-McClellan, a senior at Providence Country Day School in Rhode Island, has been vaccinated against HPV, something less than 1 percent of U.S. males can say. Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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