opioids opioids

Between 1999 and 2014, the number of deaths in the U.S. from prescribed opioids quadrupled. Meanwhile medical students were getting very little training on how to spot patients who are at risk for addiction, or how to treat it. Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook traveled from Montana to Dr. Forest Tennant's office in West Covina, Calif. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Montana's 'Pain Refugees' Leave State To Get Prescribed Opioids

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A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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Like many small towns, Bridgton, Maine, had few resources for people seeking treatment for opioid abuse. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

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Susan Sharon/MPBN

A Small Town Bands Together To Provide Opioid Addiction Treatment

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Methadone and similar drugs are legal synthetic opioids that are used to help block the cravings and withdrawal symptoms of people trying to wean themselves off prescription painkillers or heroin. Michell Eloy/WABE hide caption

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Michell Eloy/WABE

Despite Overdose Epidemic, Georgia Caps The Number Of Opioid Treatment Clinics

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Investors See Big Opportunities In Opioid Addiction Treatment

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A death certificate needs to say more than something vague like "opioid intoxication" to help law enforcement and public health officials curb the distribution of opioids, epidemiologists say. How many drugs did the person take, and which ones? Such details can help families heal, too. Alan Crawford/Getty Images hide caption

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Alan Crawford/Getty Images

Details On Death Certificates Offer Layers Of Clues To Opioid Epidemic

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The Probuphine implant delivers medication for six months. It helps reduce cravings for people with opioid use disorder. Courtesy of Braeburn Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Courtesy of Braeburn Pharmaceuticals

Long-Acting Opioid Treatment Could Be Available In A Month

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A man in Mount Airy, Md., shakes Suboxone pills from a bottle in late March. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Treating Opioid Addiction With A Drug Raises Hope And Controversy

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People in their mid-40s to mid-60s are more likely than any other group to be prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines. Both kinds of drugs can hamper breathing and mixing them is especially risky. Erwin Wodicka/iStock hide caption

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Erwin Wodicka/iStock

In Prince's Age Group, Risk Of Opioid Overdose Climbs

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We Found Joy: An Addict Struggles To Get Treatment

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Imodium is a popular brand of the drug loperamide. Because loperamide is increasingly being abused by opioid users, some toxicologists think it should have the same sales restrictions as pseudoephedrine. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images