Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

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Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

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Mineral supplements, ape-style: A female chimp called Kana eats clay in the Budongo Forest of Uganda. A.Schel/Budongo Conservation Field Station/Animal Ecology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands hide caption

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A.Schel/Budongo Conservation Field Station/Animal Ecology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Should chimps have the same legal rights as these lawyers? Steven Wise, president of the Nonhuman Rights Foundation, who is representing research chimps Hercules and Leo, says yes. Assistant Attorney General Christopher Coulston disagrees. They both made their arguments Wednesday in Manhattan State Supreme Court in New York. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Star enjoys a moment in the sun at the Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States and Chimp Haven hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States and Chimp Haven

An example of a human precision grip — grasping a first metacarpal from the thumb of a specimen of Australopithecus africanus that's thought to be 2 to 3 million years old. T.L. Kivell & M. Skinner hide caption

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T.L. Kivell & M. Skinner

Maybe Early Humans Weren't The First To Get A Good Grip

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Bonobos at the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Courtesy of Vanessa Woods hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Woods