A fisherman collects water on a beach littered with trash at an ecological reserve south of Manila in 2013. Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov

8 Million Tons Of Plastic Clutter Our Seas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/385752248/385794002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kwesi Bido, 14, (right) stops to fix 13-year-old Inusa Mohammed's flip flop. Both spend evenings and weekends searching for scrap at Agbogbloshie, an electronic waste dump in Accra, Ghana. Courtesy of Yepoka Yeebo hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Yepoka Yeebo

A Shadow Economy Lurks In An Electronics Graveyard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/374780916/374985616" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Javier Goyeneche contends that trash can be transformed into beautiful cloth — with a much higher percentage of recycled materials than found in most commercially popular recycled fabrics. Courtesy of Javier Goyeneche/Ozy.com hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Javier Goyeneche/Ozy.com

Massachusetts composting companies like City Soil, which turn food waste into compost that can be used on gardens and farms, say they expect to get quite a bit of new business from the food waste ban. Courtesy of City Soil hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of City Soil

Massachusetts Food Waste Ban Gains Broad Acceptance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/361198951/361459658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than 170 volunteers in the Brattleboro, Vt., area have contributed urine to the Rich Earth Institute field trials. Mike Earley/Courtesy of Rich Earth Institute hide caption

toggle caption Mike Earley/Courtesy of Rich Earth Institute

The digester eggs at Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brooklyn contain millions of gallons of black sludge. Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection

Turning Food Waste Into Fuel Takes Gumption And Trillions Of Bacteria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/287310897/288883527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Worker Charles Lee sorts through clothes at Mac Recycling near Baltimore. Textile recycling is a huge international business, and a small facility like Mac ships about 80 tons of clothes each week to buyers around the world. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jackie Northam/NPR

The Global Afterlife Of Your Donated Clothes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/185596830/185723881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Portland recycling handlers say they've seen more diapers in recycling bins after the city switched to biweekly trash pickups. A file photo shows bags of diapers in a container at a California recycling facility. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption David McNew/Getty Images

A 1,000-pound butter sculpture is unveiled at the 97th Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg last week. Bradley C. Bower/AP hide caption

toggle caption Bradley C. Bower/AP

This Butter Sculpture Could Power A Farm For 3 Days

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/169085074/169117499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Charlotte Douglas International Airport has deployed an army of 1.9 million worms to eat through its organic waste. The airport has reduced the trash it sends to the landfill by 70 percent. Julie Rose hide caption

toggle caption Julie Rose

One Airport's Trash Is 2 Million Worms' Treasure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167529920/167563449" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript