Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Aspirin Both Triggers And Treats An Often-Missed Disease

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When a baby is born by cesarean section, she misses out on Mom's microbes in the birth canal. Sarah Small/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers Test Microbe Wipe To Promote Babies' Health After C-Sections

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Neanderthals, represented here by a museum's reconstruction, had been living in Eurasia for 200,000 years when Homo sapiens first passed through, and the communities intermingled. The same genes that today play a role in allergies very likely fostered a quick response to local bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, scientists say. Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Itchy Eyes? Sneezing? Maybe Blame That Allergy On Neanderthals

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Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes

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Sucking may be one of the most beneficial ways to clean a baby's dirty pacifier, a study found iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Parents' Saliva On Pacifiers Could Ward Off Baby's Allergies

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Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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The sting of Solenopsis invicta, the red imported fire ant, is well known to many in the Southern United States, but immunotherapy is possible. Courtesy of Alex Wild hide caption

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Contact with animals and dirty environments may be one reason farm kids are less likely to get allergies, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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To Sniff Out Childhood Allergies, Researchers Head To The Farm

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